Edmund


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Edmund,

921–46, king of Wessex (939–46), half-brother and successor of Athelstan. Immediately after his accession he had to face an invasion of Irish vikings led by Olaf GuthfrithsonOlaf Guthfrithson
, d. 941, Norse king of Dublin (934–41). His father, Guthfrith, king of Dublin and of York, had been driven out of England by Athelstan in 927. Olaf led (937) his allies, Constantine of Scotland and Owen of Strathclyde, against Athelstan in the battle of
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. He was forced to cede to them the territory between Watling Street and the Northumbrian border (already occupied partly by Danes), and he succeeded in recapturing it in 944 only because of the quarrels among the Norse leaders. In 945 he invaded Strathclyde, which he then turned over to the Scottish king Malcolm I. Edmund was killed in a brawl and was succeeded by his brother Edred.

Edmund

illegitimate son of Earl of Gloucester; conspires against father. [Br. Hist.: King Lear]

Edmund

“a most toad-spotted traitor.” [Br. Lit.: King Lear]
See: Treason

Edmund

Saint, also called Saint Edmund Rich. 1175--1240, English churchman: archbishop of Canterbury (1234--40). Feast day: Nov. 16.
References in classic literature ?
Saxon receded the books from Edmund, and, as she heaped them in Billy's arms, read the titles.
Come for more any time you want them," Edmund invited.
As the horse continued in name, as well as fact, the property of Edmund, Mrs.
demanded Sir Edmund Andros, in loud and harsh tones.
Sir Edmund Andros looked at the old man; then he cast his hard and cruel eye over the multitude, and beheld them burning with that lurid wrath, so difficult to kindle or to quench; and again he fixed his gaze on the aged form, which stood obscurely in an open space, where neither friend nor foe had thrust himself.
He had not observed that a man was lying on the bank beside him; his garments rustled as he turned round to steal a look at the new-comer; and Edmunds raised his head.
Edmunds gradually raised himself to his knees, and looked more and more earnestly on the old man's face.
Furious with terror, he raised his stick, and struck Edmunds a heavy blow across the face.
No one save myself knew in that man's lifetime who he was, or whence he came--it was John Edmunds, the returned convict.
Edmund Randolph's parents nurtured him in this tradition and taught him that one of his primary priorities was service to king and country.
In this final volume of a trilogy that began with the National Book Award finalist The Book of the Lion and continued with The Leopard Sword, young Crusader squires Edmund and Hubert have finally made their way back to England, where Prince John is plotting to wrest power from his absent brother, King Richard.
We are looking to (the First Nations') direction on some of these things (environmentally sound logging practices)," Edmund says.