Abbey, Edward

(redirected from Edward Abbey)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Abbey, Edward

(1927–89) author, conservationist; born in Home, Pa. Raised on a Pennsylvania farm, he moved permanently to the Southwest in 1947. He published his first book, the novel Jonathan Troy, in 1954. In Desert Solitaire (1968), an account of his years as a part-time ranger in the Arches National Monument, Utah, he called for, among other things, a ban on motor vehicles in wilderness preserves. The Monkey Wrench Gang (1976), a novel about a gang of ecological saboteurs, was a bestseller and made him a cult hero; although he disavowed such extremists who actually engaged in sabotage on behalf of ecological goals, he became increasingly quirky in his writings and public statements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conley, Fred Grove, Tony Hillerman, Elmer Kelton, David Lavender, Jory Sherman and Norman Zollinger, will be posthumously inducted, along with Edward Abbey, who was voted into the Hall of Fame this year by WWA's membership.
In an interview that appears in the Canyon Productions video chronicling the life of writer Edward Abbey, he states, "I'm trying to write good books.
All the while, Pearson's nightmares, threaded with snatches of prose from the writings of Edward Abbey, are leading him closer to some final confrontation--but with what?
As Henry Beston, Aldo Leopold, Edward Abbey, Barry Lopez, Rick Bass and many others have told us, wild animals need wild country, enough of it to make a living.
The idea of wilderness needs no defense," Edward Abbey once declared, "it only needs defenders.
It brought to mind the writings of Edward Abbey, who was always advocating the restoration of our nation's river ways by eliminating the dams.
Today I share the extreme distrust of the industrial world of the American author Edward Abbey who said "One square mile of living desert is worth a hundred 'great books'".
Standing on what they stand for, as Edward Abbey used to say.
when Edward Abbey worked there as a seasonal ranger and wrote what would become the environmental classic Desert Solitaire, green travelers interested in otherworldly natural scenery, exhilarating adventure and eco-friendly culture will still find plenty to love in the area.
D'Agata's mode is closer to collage, a lyrical mosaic assembled from tiles like Edward Abbey, Edvard Munch, Harry Reid, geologic time, the origins and future of language, the corporatization of public education, suicide and suicide-prevention hotlines, atomic tourism, and a delicate reproduction of the final moments before a teenage boy--a boy D'Agata will come to fixate upon--throws himself off Bob Stupak's Stratosphere Tower.
The range of people and places, historic and present, runs to five index pages of double columns, from Edward Abbey and Africa to Yu Zhining and Yugoslavia.