Edward Caird


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Caird, Edward

 

Born Mar. 22, 1835, in Greenock; died Nov. 1, 1908, in Oxford. Scottish neo-Hegelian philosopher.

From 1866 to 1893, Caird was a professor at Glasgow and Oxford. He is known chiefly for his work in the history of philosophy. In his Critical Philosophy of Kant (2 vols. 1889), one of the most important English studies on Kant, Caird interpreted Hegel’s philosophy as the realization of Kant’s “critical idealism.” He held the basic principle of Hegel’s dialectics to be “identity in diversity.” Affirming the idea of evolution, Caird sought to apply it to the history of religion. He regarded Christianity as Absolute Religion, the highest achievement in the historical development of religion, and considered Hegel’s philosophy to be a “theoretical form” of Christianity.

WORKS

The Evolution of Religion, vols. 1–2. Glasgow, 1893.
Essays on Literature and Philosophy, vols. 1–2. Glasgow, 1892.
The Evolution of Theology in the Greek Philosophers, vols. 1–2. Glasgow, 1904.
In Russian translation:
Gegel’. Moscow, 1898.

REFERENCE

Jones, H., and J. H. Muirhead. The Life and Philosophy of Edward Caird. Glasgow, 1921.

M. A. KISSEL’

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This paper also argues that Dewey's account of the organism-environment relation derives from the work of Oxford Hegelians such as Edward Caird and Samuel Alexander, who were attempting to reconcile evolutionary ideas with a critique of Herbert Spencer's environmentalist account of human thought and action.
One of the strengths of the book is to introduce these lesser-known figures, such as Reimarus, John and Edward Caird, and Lamennais.
of Hull, UK) has chosen the previously published writings presented here as those likely to reveal the most about the political philosophy, theology, and social thought of British idealists Thomas Hill Green, Bernard Bosanquet, David Ritchie, and Edward Caird.
The British Idealist movement, influenced especially by Thomas Hill Green in Oxford and Edward Caird in Glasgow, both professors of moral philosophy, tried to free religion from its historical context by studying religion philosophically.