Said, Edward W.

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Said, Edward W.

(1935–  ) author, educator, political activist; born in Jerusalem. A Palestinian, he and his family became refugees during the 1947 partition of Palestine. He came to the U.S.A. and studied at private schools, receiving his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1964. His reading of Joseph Conrad influenced his views on colonialism. He taught English and literature at Columbia University (1963). Intensely involved both in literary scholarship and Palestinian rights, he wrote many books, most notably Orientalism (1978) and Covering Islam (1981). In the former he argued that the West's view of the Middle East and the Islamic world has been distorted by intellectual romantics; in the latter, he argued that the American view of Arabs was conditioned almost totally by a hostile media. He was a member of the Palestine National Council (1977) and a recognized leader in the Palestinian cause.
References in classic literature ?
There is another subject," Sir Edward said, "which I should like to discuss with you while we are waiting for Mr.
However, Edward said, "What the board of the Journalists Syndicate is saying is complete nonsense.
All that changed some 30 years ago when the late Edward Said, in his book "Orientalism" made it a dirty word.
Edward Said, Orientalism (New York: Vintage Books, 1979).
It was in this early period that Edward Said entered into the growing circle of Arab-Americans.
Let FREE INQUIRY further the ongoing evaluation of Edward Said, but let it maintain a certain journalistic standard in doing so.
In an interview with The Middle East magazine, published in June 2001, Edward Said said he would not be giving many more interviews.
Inspired by the work of Edward Said and his monumental Orientalism, they have historicized se emingly static categories such as race and have provided important historical depth to issues ranging from sexuality to the social sciences.
Edward Said was not fortunate enough in this regard.
Howe bases his work on an astonishingly wide range of printed sources: everything (so it seems) from Edward Said to The Orange Standard.
If the grenade-launching, towel-headed terrorist remains the essence of the Arab in Palestinian form for too many Americans (whether they readily admit it or not), the suave, urbane and sophisticated face of Edward Said has become the essence of that figure for certain educated and even liberal Americans, cool and acceptable on the surface but potentially volatile nevertheless.
Using critical theorists such as Edward Said and Hans Blumenberg, Anderson leads the reader through a discussion of central issues in modern criticism: religious vs.