Edward the Martyr


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Related to Edward the Martyr: Edward the Confessor, Ethelred the Unready

Edward the Martyr,

c.962–978, king of the English (975–78), son of Edgar by his first wife. Despite the opposition of some of the nobles, Edward succeeded his father to the throne and was crowned. However, he could not control the kingdom and was murdered at Corfe by retainers in the service of his stepmother, Queen Ælfthryth or Ælfrida, and of her son ÆthelredÆthelred,
965?–1016, king of England (978–1016), called Æthelred the Unready [Old Eng. unrœd=without counsel]. He was the son of Edgar and the half-brother of Edward the Martyr, whom he succeeded.
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. There is no proof that Ælfthryth or Æthelred planned his death, as later tradition said. Edward's body was moved to Shaftesbury, where miracles were reported, and he was regarded as a saint and martyr by the people. Feast: Mar. 18.

Edward the Martyr

Saint. ?963--978 ad, king of England (975--78), son of Edgar: murdered. Feast day: March 18
References in periodicals archive ?
It was deep and persistent, and its main representatives were typical: kings or princes who attained physical martyrdom (notably Edmund of East Anglia [d.869] and Edward the Martyr [d.978]); and women who renounced their high-born station to embrace chastity and the monastic life (such as Edburga of Winchester, Etheldreda of Ely or Edith of Wilton).
- A, Edward the Elder; B, Edward the Confessor; C, Edmund Ironside; D, Edward the Martyr. The answer was A.
and given the possible answers a) Edward the Elder b) Edward the Confessor c) Edmund Ironside or d) Edward the Martyr.
Born about 968, the son of King Edgar and his second wife Elfthryth; became King after his older half-brother Edward (later Saint Edward the Martyr) was murdered while visiting him at Corfe Gate, Dorset (March 18, 978); his reign saw a recurrence of Danish raids after 980, and the failure of armed resistance led to the payment of the Danegeld to buy off the raiders (991); a weak monarch, he assented to the massacre of Danish settlers (November 1002) and so provoked a major Danish invasion by Sweyn in retribution (1003); fled to France after Sweyn was accepted as King (1013), but returned on Sweyn's death to dispute the succession with Canute (1014); died at London in the midst of war with Canute (April 23, 1016).