Effeminacy


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Effeminacy

Blue Boy
Gainsborough painting depicting princely lad with sissyish overtones. [Br. Art.: Misc.]
Fauntleroy, Little Lord
title-inheriting, yellow-curled sissy in velvet. [Am. Lit.: Little Lord Fauntleroy]
Percy
personification of “sissy.” [Pop. Culture: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
At no point does David Ciminello's screenplay ascribe to Bruno any particular effeminacy or desire to be female.
In her chapter on "Modern Manhood" in The Psychiatric Persuasion: Knowledge, Gender, and Power in Modern America (Princeton, 1994), Lunbeck states that psychiatrists at the Boston Psychopathic Hospital had no well articulated theory of manhood, even while they assigned pathological significance to effeminacy, 237.
Thomas states that this effeminacy is caused in two ways.
The novel represents an attempt to erase effeminacy from the definition of homosexuality.
Loesberg's terms, however, do point to an important historical development linking these two moments: What we see in the concept of "inversion" is in fact a sexualizing of the earlier stigma of effeminacy Inasmuch as modern conceptions of culture developed in resistance to, as Sinfield rather sweepingly puts it, "middle-class ideology of utilitarianism and political economy, the market and empire," they also resisted dominant, more overtly public forms of masculine identity, and thus became susceptible to attack as "effeminate.
Until Wilde's trials in 1895, "it is unsafe to interpret effeminacy as defining of, or as a signal of, same-sex passions" (Sinfield 27).
Walliams added that he has always been effeminate and people confuse effeminacy with homosexuality, like they go hand-in-hand.
Complete intolerance of sexual ambivalence, effeminacy, and physical self-doubt is not hatred but love.
By analyzing Churchill's phobic juxtaposition of Garrick and the female players against the Irish fribble, this article evinces how mid-century discourses of effeminacy were also instrumental in enforcing racial taxonomies.
Locating gender at the heart of Shakespeare's oscillations between the native and the foreign in I Henry VI, Watkins brilliantly "de-nationalizes" sixteenth-century history by tracing the play's displacement of a diplomacy grounded in dynastic marriage to a foreign policy dominated by English Protestant national interests; a new order in which the female monarch's dynastic concerns were canceled by the notion that "diplomatic outreach threaten[ed] to infect the English with the effeminacy and cowardice that define[d] the foreign for Shakespeare and his Elizabethan audience" (62).
Stowe implies that such mimicry is related to effeminacy, as evidenced by Adolph's extravagant dress and penchant for waving his scented handkerchiefs like his master.
This fear of effeminacy resurfaced in the Victorian era as new medico-legal studies aimed at classifying and controlling what was then perceived as deviant bodies and sexualities.