Egeria


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Related to Egeria: Egeria densa

Egeria

(ējēr`ēə), in Roman religion and mythology, goddess or nymph of fountains. Consort and adviser of King Numa, she was also identified with DianaDiana
, in Roman religion, goddess of the moon, forests, animals, and women in childbirth. She was probably originally a forest goddess and a special patroness of women.
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 and worshiped as a goddess of childbirth. The name is used as an epithet for a female adviser or companion.

Egeria

[e′gir·ē·ə]
(astronomy)
An asteroid with a diameter of about 139 miles (224 kilometers), mean distance from the sun of 2.58 astronomical units, and G-type (C-like) surface composition.

Egeria

goddess of childbirth; protectress of the unborn. [Rom. Myth.: Avery, 425–426]

Egeria

wife, instructress, and advisor of emperor Numa. [Rom. Myth.: Jobes, 491; Avery, 426]
See: Counsel
References in periodicals archive ?
Amiel's relationship with Egeria was equally passionate.
The account of the pilgrimage of Egeria through Palestine, Egypt, and Asia Minor reveals both her understandings of the holy places as evidence for the biblical truths, and the ways in which she charted these truths both textually and onto the landscape.
When she is too pressed for time to describe a place, Egeria simply tells her sisters to look it up in the Old Testament for a proper description.
Egeria is 12 feet tall with three tiers and was first installed at the 2002 Burning Man, a weeklong arts festival held yearly at Black Rock Desert in Nevada.
Porrhomma myops and Porrhomma egeria in the Czech Republic.
One of the most famous of such pilgrims in late antiquity was the late fourth-century Spanish nun, Egeria, who kept a diary of her pilgrimage to Egypt, Palestine, and Syria.
[H]e pretended that he had nocturnal interviews with the divine nymph Egeria; and that it was on her advice that he was instituting the religious ritual most acceptable to Heaven, and was appointing special priests for each major deity." The laws of Numa Pompilius, it was thought, brought 40 years of peace to the Romans.
While she may not have been another Mme Arman de Caillavet, nor her salon the equal of that hosted by Anatole France's Egeria, she was evidently capable of holding her own in conversation with some of the brighter lights in the intellectual firmament of mid-nineteenth-century Paris.
Jeffrey Shaffer, vice president of sales of Egeria USA, a relatively new player in the U.S.
In others, such as the odd couple of Lillian Gish and Paul Cadmus as the nymph Egeria and the Roman king Numa Pompilius, the obscurity of the reference adds to the mystery of the image, leaving the viewer to come up with his own interpretation.