Egyptian Revival style

Egyptian Revival style

(1830–1850)
A revival style distinguished by distinctive columns and capitals and a smooth monolithic exterior finish. Characteristic battered walls are edged with roll moldings, tall straight-headed windows with splayed jambs, and a deep cavetto or gorge-and-roll cornice. Roofs are flat, and the smooth wall surface lends a monumental appearance reminiscent of pylons or gateways to Egyptian temples.
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Renovations in 1922 and 1929 converted the design to reveal an Egyptian Revival style, with the entrance featuring yellow reed molding and intricate pharaoh heads.
Nestled among the graves is the 1913-vintage Hope Abbey Mausoleum, a small architectural gem designed in the Egyptian Revival style by Ellis Lawrence, first dean of architecture at the UO and the original designer of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.
A unique coved cornice, original concrete freight canopies and exposed beams were preserved--along with the structure's Egyptian revival style.
It is considered one of the few American examples of the Egyptian Revival style.
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the warehouse is considered one of the few American examples of the Egyptian Revival style.

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