Ahab

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Ahab

Ahab (āˈhăb), d. c.853 B.C., king of Israel (c.874–c.853 B.C.), son and successor of Omri (1.) Ahab was one of the greatest kings of the northern kingdom. He consolidated the good foreign relations his father had fostered, and Israel was at peace during much of his reign. His marriage with Jezebel helped his friendship with Tyre, and his alliance with Jehoshaphat (1,) king of Judah, made Ahab sure of his less powerful neighbor to the south. Ahab's prestige is seen in Assyrian inscriptions mentioning his alliance against Shalmaneser III (see Shalmaneser I), who won an indecisive victory (c.854 B.C.) at Karkar on the Orontes. After this campaign Ahab and Benhadad (2) of Damascus went to war over the country E of the Jordan. Ahab was killed in battle. The biblical account of Ahab's reign is most interesting in its religious aspects. To the devout, Ahab's foreign wife, with her Tyrian cults and behavior, represented evil. Besides, she was a willful woman and entertained exalted ideas of royal prerogative. She met her match in Elijah, the champion of Israel's God. He was an important factor in the discontent that began to develop in Israel at this period. Ahab was succeeded by his sons, first Ahaziah, then Jehoram. The ruins of his palace have been excavated at Samaria. The Ahab of Jer. 29.21,22 is a different person, a lying prophet.
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Ahab

honored false gods, usurped others’ land; byword for baseness. [O.T.: I Kings 17:29–34; 21:25]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Ahab

Old Testament the king of Israel from approximately 869 to 850 bc and husband of Jezebel: rebuked by Elijah (I Kings 16:29--22:40)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(16) The NJPS translation renders the repeated word ehav two different ways in this verse: first as "kinsfolk" and then as "kinsmen." In order to emphasize the effect of the repetition of the same word, I modified the translation to read "kinsmen" in each case.
Mordecai, accepted as a leader by the multitude of his brothers (le-rov ehav), even if not by all of them, becomes the dover shalom, the "speaker of peace," a quality and an enterprise akin to seeking the good of his people (doresh tov le-ammo, Esth.
The overwhelming majority of referents, however, have to do with those characters' kinship to others, speaking of them in terms of their being bat [a daughter of], ben [a son of], ahoto [his sister], ehav [his brothers], or mi-yaldei ha-ivrim [one of the Hebrews' children].