Eifelian Stage

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Eifelian Stage

 

the lower stage of the Middle Devonian system (period). The Eifelian was established in the Eifel Mountains (in what is now the Federal Republic of Germany) in 1848 by the Belgian geologist A. Dumont. The stratotype of the Eifelian is represented chiefly by marls. In the Ardennes of Belgium it corresponds approximately to the shales of the Couvinian stage of J. d’Omalius d’Halloi, whose base is stratigraphically lower than the base of the Eifelian.

In the USSR the Eifelian (Couvinian) is taken to be more inclusive than in the stratotype and includes the analogues of the Zlihovian stage of Czechoslovakia and the upper part of the Em-sian stage of the Rhine region. The Eifelian, which is divided into two substages, is widespread and represented by various rocks, such as marine carbonate and terrigenous rocks, evaporites, continental detrital rocks, and effusive rocks. In the USSR, complex ores, bauxites, iron, manganese, titanium, petroleum, rock salt, and other mineral products are associated with Eifelian beds.

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Carbon isotope stratigraphy of Lochkovian to Eifelian limestones from the Devonian of central and southern Europe.
For those not interested in stratigraphic details like the basal conodont zone of the Eifelian, a useful overview for each period (plate tectonics, life, extinctions, climate, environments, stages in global history, and more) can be plucked out without too much sieving.
Accordingly, this new crinoid material should be regarded as upper Eifelian in age (Spading 1999; Baird and others 1999).
The bedrock, mostly Eifelian sand- and siltstones of the Middle Devonian Arukula Regional Stage ([D.
Biostratigraphy of the Emsian to Eifelian in the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland).
The Eifelian sandstone of the Middle Devonian Arukula Regional Stage, covered with a thin layer of the reddish-brown till of the last glaciation, crops out near the mouth of the river.
During the second part of the Eifelian, in Narva time, transgressive tidally influenced, mixed carbonate-siliciclastic subtidal to supratidal shallow marine deposits partially filled the DBB (Tanavsuu-Milkeviciene et al.
The Emsian Stage appears to be much longer than earlier considered, and the Eifelian and Givetian are significantly shorter (Kaufmann 2006, fig.