Beatitudes

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Beatitudes

(bē-ăt`ĭto͞odz') [Lat.,=blessing], in the Gospel of St. Matthew, eight blessings uttered by Jesus at the opening of the Sermon on the Mount. Some, counting verses differently, say there are nine. In a parallel passage in the Gospel of St. Luke, only four of the blessings appear, with four corresponding woes.

Beatitudes

 

New Testament precepts of moral and social character ascribed to Jesus Christ by Christian tradition and invested with divine authority (The Sermon on the Mount in Matthew, ch. 5, and Luke, ch. 6). They define which people may hope for beatification because of their social and moral condition (“Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven”). They also call on those in want to be humble and submissive (“Do not resist one who is evil”). Societies with antagonistic class conditions use the Beatitudes to strengthen the system based on exploitation.

References in periodicals archive ?
The 'eight maids a-milking' are the eight Beatitudes.
And, of course, in the counter-cultural Eight Beatitudes in Matthew 5, Jesus says that the "poor in spirit" are blessed.
The eight maids a-milking were the eight beatitudes.
Eight maids a-milking are the eight beatitudes - the virtues in life Jesus taught in the Sermon on the Mount.
Eight maids a-milking refers to the eight beatitudes
The other parts of the song also have symbolic meanings as follows: Two turtle doves - the Old and New Testaments Three French hens - the theological virtues of faith, hope, and charity Four calling birds - the four gospels or the four evangelists Five golden rings - the Pentateuch or the first five books of the Bible which describe the fall of humanity from grace Six geese-a-laying - the six days of creation Seven swans-a-swimming - the seven sacraments and the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit Eight maids-a-milking - the eight beatitudes Nine ladies dancing - the nine fruits of the Holy Spirit Ten Lords-a-leaping - the Ten Commandments Eleven pipers piping - the 11 faithful apostles Twelve drummers drumming - the 12 articles of the Apostles Creed'O
There are also Eight Beatitudes, Ten Commandments, Twelve Apostles, Twelve Fruits of the Holy Spirit, and Twenty-one Ecumenical Councils.
We shriek with laughter when we remember our pranks and jokes in convent high school, such as merrily mixing up the Eight Beatitudes, inserting a ruler under the butt of the classmate dozing off seated in front of you, and the chubby classmate who sacrilegiously used her Sodality medal as a safety pin to fasten the waistband of her uniform's skirt after its button had popped out.
Referring to a reading he'd given earlier from Matthew's Gospel, the eight Beatitudes, or as he called them the "beautiful attitudes", he continued: "These are Christ's warnings and encouragements.
CONTINUED from last Sunday's column, here are the last four of the eight Beatitudes of Jesus, interpreted metaphysically: