Eighteenth Brumaire

Eighteenth Brumaire

 

(of year VIII of the Republic, according to the republican calendar of the Great French Revolution), a coup d’etat carried out on Nov. 9-10, 1799, by Napoleon Bonaparte. It led to the overthrow of the Directory and the establishment of a military dictatorship in France, first in the form of the Consulate and later the Empire (from 1804). The coup d’etat of 18th Brumaire, which was organized by the big bourgeoisie to consolidate its rule, was supported by the wealthy peasants, who saw in the military dictatorship a way of protecting their property from attacks by the poor peasants as well as the feudal nobility. The toiling masses, who had not yet recovered from their defeats in the Germinal and Prairial uprisings in 1795 and from the failure of G. Babeuf’s plot (1797), could not actively oppose the coup d’etat of 18th Brumaire. The coup d’etat completed the process of the bourgeois counterrevolution, which had begun with Thermidor in 1794.

References in periodicals archive ?
This is a little different from Marx's own claims concerning Louis Bonaparte's strategy in The Eighteenth Brumaire, but it is up to Harries to show us more clearly what the difference is.
The first easily available translation of The Eighteenth Brumaire into English appeared in 1914.
Commending the grubbing of the revolutionary old mole in The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, Karl Marx tacitly promotes an art of dirt alongside a practice of the dig.
Borrowing from Marx's The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte as elaborated in Walter Benjamin's theory of history, we may say that "the specters of history" in Fellini's Roma come back like a Freudian return of the repressed, yet all dressed up in self-parading garb.
Taking his cue from Karl Marx's The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon, in which Marx claimed that history repeats itself, but the second time around turns tragedy into farce, white asked who chooses these modes of tragedy and farce, is it history, revealing its true shape, or is it the historian who must have a story to tell and can only do so in the forms provided by culture?
Through labour, "Men make their own history, but not of their own free will" (Karl Marx, "The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte," in David Fernbach, ed.
1) I want to counterpoise that formulation with what I have come to see as a very different way of thinking, one which I think allows for a better understanding of the two-sidedness of the relationship between what Gutman might have called "power" and "culture," and one which I think helps me see the way to a better, more useful, and I'd even say more radical version of history: the formulation offered by Karl Marx at the outset of The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte: "Men make their own history, but they do not make it just as they please; they do not make it under circumstances chosen by themselves, but under circumstances directly encountered, given and transmitted from the past.
Repetition with a difference is the basis of a Freudian concept of healing in his introductory Lectures, of Marx's famous words about tragedy and farce in the Eighteenth Brumaire, and of Adrienne Rich's feminist concept of re-vision' in "When We Dead Awaken," but it also has particular implications in black culture and literature.
We could again enter into a battle of citation, as well as a discussion of the relation between dream and reality in the colonial and decolonizing process, but here I want to counter Verges by considering Fanon's use of the quotation from Marx's Eighteenth Brumaire as the epigraph to "By Way of Conclusion" of Black Skin.
They cannot represent themselves; they must be represented" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte.
In the Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, Marx reasoned that the gap between the objective politics of French peasantry and its subjective hostility towards progressive politics is the result of rationalization - i.
Marx's jest appears in The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, which he began in 1851, and it refers to that year's coup d'etat by Louis Bonaparte, the nephew of the great Napoleon, who had himself executed a coup d'etat in 1799, on the 9th of November--the 18th of the revolutionary month of brumaire.