Eileithyia


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Eileithyia

ancient Greek goddess of childbirth. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 92]
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
921-923) Lastly, he made Hera his blooming wife: and she was joined in love with the king of gods and men, and brought forth Hebe and Ares and Eileithyia.
After his first mention of the Prytaneion, Pausanias proceeds to the lower part of the city, mentioning the Sanctuary of Serapis and the Temple of Eileithyia.
Tal es el caso de la cueva de Eileithyia de Amnisos, cuyo interior ofrece una estalagmita rodeada de un murete de piedras que se ha interpretado como una estatua natural de culto o betilo (Faure 1964: 84), junto a diversas cubetas o gours rellenos de agua.
From the halls of the Father, from the celestial peaks, the Son gave order [[GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]] to all the weary human race and a pure virgin [[GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]], having no wedding experience, brought him forth without the pains of Eileithyia.
Notable among his offspring were the twins Apollo and Artemis, by the Titaness Leto; Helen, by Leda of Sparta; Persephone, by the goddess Demeter; Athena, born from his head after he had swallowed the Titaness Metis; Hephaestus, Hebe, Ares, and Eileithyia, by his wife, Hera; Dionysus, by Semele; and many others.
Burnett thinks that she is Eileithyia, |The Race with the Pleiades', CP 59 (1964), 30-3.
His marriage to Hera, the powerful pre - Hellenic goddess of Argos, brought forth Hebe, Ares, and Eileithyia.