Einhard


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Einhard

(īn`härt) or

Eginhard

(ā`gĭnhärt), c.770–840, Frankish historian. Educated in the monastery of Fulda, he continued his studies at Charlemagne's palace school in Aachen and rose to high favor with the emperor. Emperor Louis I made Einhard tutor or adviser to his son Lothair. Later he became the abbot of several monasteries and was rewarded with grants of land. In 830 he sought to reconcile Louis and the rebellious Lothair. Einhard wrote the Vita Karoli Magni (Life of Charlemagne), based on his 23 years of service with Charlemagne. Using SuetoniusSuetonius
(Caius Suetonius Tranquillus) , c.A.D. 69–c.A.D. 140, Roman biographer. Little is known about his life except that he was briefly the private secretary of Emperor Hadrian.
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's word portrait of Augustus as his model, Einhard described all aspects of Charlemagne's appearance and activities. Other writings include a history of the transferral from Rome to Germany of the relics of Marcellinus and Peter (4th-century martyrs). His works and correspondence are accurate and detailed sources on contemporary society. However, the annals that bear his name were almost certainly not written by him.

Einhard

 

(also Eginhard). Born circa 770, in Maingau; died Mar. 14, 840, in Seligenstadt. A figure in the Carolingian renaissance; friend and adviser to Charlemagne.

Einhard was educated in the monastery at Fulda. At the court of Charlemagne he won recognition for his knowledge of science and the arts, and he became an active member of the Academy. He supervised the construction of the cathedral at Aachen and the royal palace at Ingelheim. The Vita Caroli Magni (Life of Charlemagne) written by Einhard in Latin after Charlemagne’s death enjoyed wide popularity in the Middle Ages. The work contains a great deal of factual information, but owing to his adulation of Charlemagne, Einhard distorted his accounts of the emperor’s foreign policy and wars. Some of Einhard’s religious works and more than 60 of his letters have been preserved.

WORKS

Vie de Charlemagne. Paris, 1923.

REFERENCE

Kleinclausz, A. Eginhard. Paris, 1942.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some subjects, such as Einhard, Paul the Deacon, Ermold, Angelberga and Alcuin, are associated with the Carolingian courts.
Dating back to Roman times, it has at its centre the attractive Einhard Basilika, which has a former Benedictine monastery attached to it, now transformed into a museum where you can learn about the former life of the monks and inhabitants of the town.
Dating back to Roman times, it has at its centre the attractive Einhard Basilika which has a former Benedictine monastery attached to it, now transformed into a museum where you can learn about the former life of the monks and inhabitants of the town.
An "extraordinary range of evidence" is considered, including the popular Vita karoli by Einhard, the Annales regni francorum (RFA), and the revised RFA, along with the less-popular capitularies, charters, letters, minor annals, and poetry.
Distilling the contributions of Jonas of Orlrans, Dungal, Agobard of Lyons, Walahfrid Strabo and the lay courtier Einhard, Noble provides a compelling account of the terms and stakes of this period of Frankish debate.
According to the emperor's biographer, Einhard, Charlemagne kept tablets and blanks in his bed under his pillow so he could practice forming letters in his leisure hours.
The writer Einhard travelled with Charlemagne and described what happened to 4,500 rebellious Saxons: "By the king's command they were all beheaded in one day upon the river Aller, in the place called Verden.
However, there is no evidence that this material was worked before the 19th century, and Charlemagne's biographer, Einhard the Frank, specifically states that he was unable to obtain marble and columns locally.
He wrote in the same century as the Carolingian historian, Einhard.
The book is repetitive and reveals some niggling errors, for example in tabulations of manuscripts or in a paragraph where she is speaking about Einhard and then slips and calls him Alcuin.
Barbero's comprehensive study sythesizes many primary sources such as the biographers Einhard and Notker, the annals, chronicles, and laws.
This was obviously true for Einhard (discussed by David Ganz), but equally so for Nithard (discussed by Stuart Airlie) and even Dhuoda (discussed by Janet Nelson), who expected her son to show her handbook to others.