special relativity

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special relativity

(rel-ă-tiv -ă-tee) See relativity, special theory.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

special relativity

[′spesh·əl rel·ə′tiv·əd·ē]
(relativity)
The division of relativity theory which relates the observations of observers moving with constant relative velocities and postulates that natural laws are the same for all such observers.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of dark matter in the universe in a form of virtual matter that reveals itself only gravitationally is, thus, dictated by the Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox of Einstein's special theory of relativity. Accordingly, (i) the fate of the dark matter particle(s) theories as well as (ii) the fate of their competing theories of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND [4]) are likely to follow the fate of the eighteenth century phlogiston theory and the nineteenth century luminiferous ether theory, which were initiated as ad hoc postulates and which, subsequently, became obsolete.
According to Einstein's special theory of relativity, it would take an infinite amount of energy to accelerate an object through the light barrier.
Einstein's special theory of relativity revealed the possibility of accelerated travel into the future (SN: 12/21E28/02, p.
To avoid such apparently nonsensical speeds, many popular astronomy texts appeal to Einstein's special theory of relativity, which replaces Newtonian physics for very high velocities.
This era started 100 years ago with the publication of Albert Einstein's special theory of relativity and came to its height in the 1920s when the theory of relativity was used to develop the big bang model.
Einstein's special theory of relativity unifies space and time as aspects of a single, four-dimensional entity known as space-time.
With the help of an innovative computer-graphics technique and the equations of Einstein's special theory of relativity, Ping-Kang Hsiung and Robert H.P.
According to Kenneth Brecher of Boston University, these observations provide the most stringent test to date of a central postulate in Einstein's special theory of relativity.

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