Einstein's field equations

Einstein's field equations

[′īn‚stīnz ′fēld i‚kwā·zhənz]
(relativity)
Those equations relevant to the relationship in which the Einstein tensor equals -8π times the energy momentum tensor times the gravitational constant divided by the square of the speed of light. Also known as Einstein's law of gravitation.
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The year 2015 also marks the 100th anniversary of Einstein's geometric theory of space-time and gravitation, the General Theory of Relativity, since the final formulation of the generally covariant Einstein's field equations of gravitation in the last quarter of 1915 (during a very tragic and difficult time of World War I).
PR satisfies Einstein's field equations but does not utilize weak field approximation.
In his original paper [1], Kurt Godel has derived an exact solution to Einstein's field equations in which the matter takes the form of a pressure-free perfect fluid (dust solution).
Let one uses Einstein's Field Equations [5], with the inclusion of the [LAMBDA] "cosmological constant" term.
This is the singularity that Karl Schwarzschild discovered when he solved Einstein's field equations for a symmetrical, non-rotating body.
Static Solutions of Einstein's Field Equations for Sphere of Fluid.
This paper explains how within Schwarzschild's solution [2] to Einstein's field equations the effects of gravity can be represented as a velocity and as an apportionment of mass-energy equivalence.
It is instructive to note that our generalized metric tensor satisfy Einstein's field equations and the invariance of the line element; by virtue of their construction [1, 12].
The above equations are analogous to the gravitoelectromagnetic (GEM) equations derived by Mashhoon [2] as a lowest order approximation to Einstein's field equations for v << c and r >> R.
This paper reveals and amplifies a few such anomalies, including the fact that Einstein's field equations for the so-called static vacuum configuration, [R.
The only solutions known for Einstein's field equations involve a single gravitating source interacting with a test particle.

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