special relativity

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special relativity

(rel-ă-tiv -ă-tee) See relativity, special theory.

special relativity

[′spesh·əl rel·ə′tiv·əd·ē]
(relativity)
The division of relativity theory which relates the observations of observers moving with constant relative velocities and postulates that natural laws are the same for all such observers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of dark matter in the universe in a form of virtual matter that reveals itself only gravitationally is, thus, dictated by the Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox of Einstein's special theory of relativity.
The improved way to study Einstein's special theory of relativity, offered by the author in his recently published book [1], enables the origin of the dark matter/energy in the Universe and the Pioneer anomaly to be determined.
These analogies, in turn, uncover the Relativistic Invariant Mass Paradox in Section 5, the physical significance of which is illustrated in Section 6 in the frame of Einstein's special theory of relativity.
6 The physical significance of the paradox in Einstein's special theory of relativity
0] of (12) is compatible with the validity of (14) in Einstein's special theory of relativity is presented in [1, Theorem 11.
Einstein's special theory of relativity unifies space and time as aspects of a single, four-dimensional entity known as space-time.
With the help of an innovative computer-graphics technique and the equations of Einstein's special theory of relativity, Ping-Kang Hsiung and Robert H.
According to Kenneth Brecher of Boston University, these observations provide the most stringent test to date of a central postulate in Einstein's special theory of relativity.

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