Einstein equations

Einstein equations

[′īn‚stīn i‚kwā·zhənz]
(statistical mechanics)
Equations for the density and pressure of a Bose-Einstein gas in terms of power series in a parameter which appears in the Bose-Einstein distribution law.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
in the Einstein equations [G.sub.ab] = [[kappa].sub.0][T.sub.ab], one gets the following relation between the parameters [B.sub.*] and [B.sub.0]:
In general relativity the Cauchy development of a Cauchy hypersurface [S.sub.0] is governed by the Einstein equations, where of course the second fundamental form of [S.sub.0] has also to be specified.
As to this matter Professor Radu Miron has a simple idea, as all great ideas: to consider the Einstein equations in Lagrange spaces as the Einstein equations associated to the canonical metrical connection from the almost Hermitian model.
In fact, due to its peculiar formulation, it leads to view the usual Einstein equations as merely initial conditions following the Cauchy problem.
Dr Bruni said: "Much more work will be needed in future to fully comprehend the importance of the differences between simulations based on Einstein equations and those making simplifying assumptions.
In November 1915 Albert Einstein presented to the Prussian Academy of Sciences in Berlin four papers on general relativity, the so-called Einstein equations which were he said 'the most valuable theory of his life' and 'of incomparable beauty' describing the evolution of the Universe, black holes, the behaviour of orbiting neutron stars, gravitational lensing, and why clocks run slower on the surface of the Earth than in space and the possibility of time travel.
Despite the diversity of energy-momentum complexes, there are a wide range of solutions to the Einstein equations for which they exhibit identical results.
Finding nonstatic exact solutions of the Einstein equations for a particular configuration of matter is nontrivial.
of California-Davis) show that the Einstein equations for a spherically symmetric spacetime in Standard Schwazschild Coordinates close to form a system of three ordinary differential equations for a family of self-similar expansion waves, and that embedded as a single point in this family is the critical (k = 0) Friedmann universe associated with the pure radiation phase of the Standard Model of Cosmology.
The Einstein equations, brilliant as they are, reveal a universe that is 90 percent hidden from our eyes.