Einstein equations

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Einstein equations

[′īn‚stīn i‚kwā·zhənz]
(statistical mechanics)
Equations for the density and pressure of a Bose-Einstein gas in terms of power series in a parameter which appears in the Bose-Einstein distribution law.
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All come from a single assumption, a limited development, and classical solutions of the Einstein field equations.
The Einstein field equations for spacetime given in equation (21) is
M] is reducible and Ricci symmetric, plays a key role in finding some physically meaningful solutions of imperfect Einstein field equations, in particular viscous fluids.
Einstein used tensors to develop his equation describing the gravitational field, known as the Einstein field equation.
This procedure in principle can be applied to any solution of the Einstein field equations with or without source (momentum-energy tensor).
The Einstein field equations and the energy conservation law for [LAMBDA](t) models are:
There is only one plane symmetric static vacuum solution of Einstein field equations.
Schwarzschild found in 1916 an exact solution of the Einstein field equations describing the field created by a point particle [1].
is the curvature superforce in the Einstein field equations [7].
Therefore, the Einstein field equations can be eventually written in the form:
First, it is necessary to obtain the exact solution of the Einstein field equations for the space-time metric induced by the gravitational field of a sphere of incompressible liquid.
With sufficiently clever assumptions of this sort, it is often possible to reduce the Einstein field equations to a much simpler system of equations, even a single partial differential equation (as in the case of stationary axisymmetric vacuum solutions, which are characterised by the Ernst equation) or a system of ordinary differential equations (this led to the first exact analytical solution--the famous Schwarzschild's solution [2]).