Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment

Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment

[′īn‚stīn pə′däl·skē ′rōz·ənik‚sper·ə·mənt]
(quantum mechanics)
A Gedanken experiment which was introduced to argue that quantum mechanics is not a complete theory, involving polarization measurements on two photons emitted in opposite directions in an atomic cascade. Abbreviated EPR experiment.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Section 5, we study the EPRB experiment, the Bohm version of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment. Its theoretical resolution in space and time shows that a causal interpretation exists where each atom has a position and a spin.
Consider a typical entanglement paradox similar to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment. Two entangled photons fly away from a common source toward distant laboratories set up to measure polarization--the orientation of the light's vibrations.
One suspects that Smith understands nothing of these subjects (statements like, "In lay language, what the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment demonstrates is that if you separate two interacting particles and give one of them a downspin, instantly the other will spin upward" [p.174], do not inspire confidence), but he feels no shame in lecturing on their metaphysical significance.
Physics, by the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment, shows that the universe is ruled from beyond space and time.
Second, the debate over the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment concerns which member (or members) of a set of mutually inconsistent propositions should be rejected.