Ejective


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ejective

 

a consonant articulated with a closure and upward movement of the glottis, as a result of which air is ejected in a sharp burst, giving the effect of a glottal stop. Ejectives are usually stops. They are found in the languages of Asia, America, and Africa and in the Dagestan and Kartevelian languages (ρ’, t’, k’,c’). Fricative ejectives are less common, for example, Hausa ’ya’ya (”children”).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ejective and voiced labial phonemes are harder to distinguish from each other, especially in non-initial positions where contrast is nearly neutralized.
In word-final position the ejective /p/ and the voiced /b/ are both realized as the voiceless unreleased stop [p], which coincides with a wider pattern of final devoicing and deglottalization in the language.
'Phonetic conditioning of word-final ejective stops in the speech of Scottish English pre-school children'.
The use of qualitative data from semi-structured interviews helps unearth a number of features that have received little or no attention with regard to any L1 accent in the British Isles, among them the use of ejectives and an unusually fronted hesitation particle.
The research also indicate that as elevation increases, so does the likelihood of languages with ejectives.
Other unfamiliar phonemes also suggest word breaks: ejectives in (f and 1), and an aspirated uvular in (j).
Tolowa (Athabaskan, Northern Amerindian) has a contrast between plain and ejective stops in all oral noncontinuants; this contrast does not exist in the labials, however.
Since the book under review deals with historical phonetics, special mention should be made of the glottalized or ejective pronunciation of some consonants, of the rounded or labialized consonants, and of the considerable number of palatalized consonants, features that are not known in the other Semitic languages.
VOT of aspirated stops was found longest, for voiced stops it was shortest, and ejectives had an intermediate VOT.
Lonnet and Simeone-Serelle also confirm that the emphatic consonants of MSA are glottalized rather than pharyngealized, placing MSA with Ethiopic, against Arabic; this supports the conclusion that Proto-Semitic emphatics were glottalized ejectives. (See, for example, A.