Ejective


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Ejective

 

a consonant articulated with a closure and upward movement of the glottis, as a result of which air is ejected in a sharp burst, giving the effect of a glottal stop. Ejectives are usually stops. They are found in the languages of Asia, America, and Africa and in the Dagestan and Kartevelian languages (ρ’, t’, k’,c’). Fricative ejectives are less common, for example, Hausa ’ya’ya (”children”).

References in periodicals archive ?
Here the MOD constraints express the fact that voiceless stops can be distinctively ejective.
An example in which affricates pattern with voiceless stops, in terms of their being potentially ejective, is Nootka, as shown in (20).
Since the Nootka affricates also have the features [-cont] and [-voice], these segments are predicted to have ejective counterparts.
w]/to result in a glottal stop, as in Takelma (Sapir 1912: 44), in which a labialized velar ejective before /xC/ becomes a glottal stop.
An anonymous reviewer points out that Hausa specialists usually regard Hausa as having a single "glottalized" series, realized as ejective or glottalized implosive according to place of articulation.
In the case of Nez Perce (706, Northern Penutian, Northern Amerindian), the information on the stop or affricate nature of the apico-alveolars, and hence on the nature of a subset of the ejective consonants, is ambiguous.