El Morro National Monument


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See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 49,075 (19,868) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.

El Morro National Monument:

see National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 49,075 (19,868) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (table).
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El Morro National Monument

Address:HC 61 Box 43
Ramah, NM 87321

Phone:505-783-4226
Fax:505-783-4689
Web: www.nps.gov/elmo/
Size: 1,279 acres.
Established: Proclaimed on December 8, 1906.
Location:125 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. From I-40 at Gallup (56 miles), go south on NM 602, then east on NM 53 through Ramah. From I-40 at Grants (42 miles), go southwest on NM 53.
Facilities:Campground (é), picnic area, rest rooms (é), visitor center (é), museum/exhibit, self-guided tour/trail. Entrance fee required.
Activities:Camping, hiking.
Special Features:Ancestral Puebloans settled on the mesa top over 700 years ago. Spanish and American travelers rested, drank from the pool and carved their signatures, dates and messages for hundreds of years. Today, the national monument protects more than 2,000 inscriptions and petroglyphs, as well as Ancestral Puebloan ruins.

See other parks in New Mexico.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
INFO: El Morro National Monument ($3, ages 16 and under free; www.nps.gov/elmo or 505/783-4226) is on State 53, 42 miles southwest of Grants, New Mexico.
These early American parks which include Ocmulgee National Monument in Georgia, Fort Raleigh National Historic Site in North Carolina, De Soto National Memorial in Florida, El Morro National Monument in New Mexico, San Juan National Historic Site in Puerto Rico, Roger Williams National Memorial in Rhode Island, and Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site in Massachusetts, as well as several state and private historical parks--represent the complex interplay of European, African, and American Indian cultures involved in the struggle for North America.