El Niño Southern Oscillation

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El Niño Southern Oscillation

[el ¦nēn·yō ¦səth·ərn ‚äs·ə′lā·shən]
(oceanography)
The irregular cyclic swing in atmospheric pressure in the tropical Pacific.
The irregular cyclic swing of warm and cold phases in the tropical Pacific. Abbreviated ENSO.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On high islands, changes in rainfall patterns either from interannual variations due to El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or a changed climate regime have caused severe shortages of water (3-5).
The 1993 HPS outbreak in the southwestern United States may have resulted from improvements in the quality of deer mouse habitat caused by the 1991-92 El Nino southern oscillation (24).
The AEF Hurricane Index reflects fluctuations in climate signals, such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the variability of sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), all of which can influence hurricane activity.
The precise cause of this can be ascribed to the collapsed (surface) La Nina event and the presumptuous onset of its alternate: a weak El Nino Southern Oscillation.
By some measures 1997-1998 El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) was the strongest such event of the 20th century and perhaps the strongest of all recorded history.
Every year, except 1994, when populations may have been recovering from El Nino southern oscillation conditions and thus showed an atypical pattern, population density of P.
However, AIR's model does not explicitly include the possible effect of the El Nino Southern Oscillation, nor does it quantify demand surge, the additional cost of building materials that follows a hurricane.
The El Nino Southern Oscillation is a global-scale climate phenomenon characterized by changes in sea surface temperatures.
This intruiging situation seems to mirror the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) of a year ago where, despite sea-temperature cooling, the oscillation factor was not completely in line with the surface indicators' decline and lingering influences persisted.
According to the researchers, the Martian layers could be evidence of a shorter-term process that affects the deposition of ice and dust at the poles, perhaps similar to the way the El Nino Southern Oscillation produces intermittent changes in Pacific Ocean temperatures and rainfall.