El Tajín

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El Tajín

(ĕl tähēn`), ruins, Veracruz state, E central Mexico, representing the remains of a pre-Columbian city-state that flourished in A.D. 100–1200. The site was associated with an ethnic group called the Totonac, and its growth was at first tied with the expansion of TeotihuacánTeotihuacán
, ancient commercial and religious center in the central valley of Mexico, c.30 mi (48 km) NE of Mexico City. Once thought to be the great religious center of the Toltec, it is now held to be the relic of an earlier civilization.
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 in the Valley of Mexico. Following the decline of the latter after A.D. 700, El Tajín grew in importance. The most impressive relic is the spectacular Pyramid of the Niches (c.600–900 A.D.), which contains 365 niches.
References in periodicals archive ?
Befitting a symposium held in Mexico City on the site of the Aztec Great Temple, this volume concentrates on ritual public architecture in prehispanic central Mexico: only five of the 13 chapters deal with other topics--three on lowland Maya sites and one each on San Lorenzo and El Tajin, on the Gulf Coast.
Rex Koontz tackles El Tajin on the Gulf Coast, possibly intermediary between Yucatin and the highlands (or, specifically, between Chichen Itza and Tula) in the Terminal Classic, but so little published, apart from its sculptures, that accurate assessment is difficult.
El Pital somewhat resembles El Tajin, a nearby Classic-Era city.
El Tajin, near Papantla, is off the beaten tourist track but worth the trip.
They suggest stimulus from the Peten, not direct from Central Mexico, and in the sixth century; the ground striking platforms on the green and other Mexican obsidian blades found would seem to date to after AD 800--the late contact here may well have been via the Gulf Coast polity of El Tajin.
As it is, the Olmec in Southern Verzcruz feature prominently in this book, while what the editors define as the Northern Gulf Lowlands, north of the Rio Cazones, is left out, with the entire archaeology of the Huaxteca; in fact even the area south of that to the Rio Nautla, including the important site of El Tajin, hardly gets a look in.