recoil

(redirected from Elastic recoil)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

recoil

the motion acquired by a particle as a result of its emission of a photon or other particle

Recoil

 

in firearms, the reverse movement of the barrel or breech caused by the energy of the powder gases when a pistol, rifle, or artillery gun is fired. The movement goes in the direction opposite to the direction of firing.

Recoil is manifested as a force that affects the firer or gun mount. In automatic weapons, the recoil is used for reloading (opening the breech, ejecting the used cartridge, loading the next round, closing the breech, and setting the firing pin).

recoil

[′rē‚kȯil]
(mechanics)
References in periodicals archive ?
The higher tension levels (T3 and T4) would never be utilised during normal training or testing scenarios, however, for the purposes of identifying the biomechanical effect of elastic recoil force, it was necessary to include these in the current protocol.
Some of this stored energy could also be converted to transverse kinetic energy upon elastic recoil and stored transiently by elastic elements in the legs on the opposite side of the animal.
Subsequent easing of the load does not allow elastic recoil to restore the bone's original shape.
Approximately 70% of the impact energy affecting web extension is lost as heat through viscoelastic processes, thereby avoiding web failure or elastic recoil, which would result in loss of prey.
This viscous behavior is important because it controls the elastic recoil in tissues, thus acting as a shock absorber.
2) The LMCA differs from the other coronary arteries by its relatively greater elastic tissue content which can explain elastic recoil and high restenosis rate following balloon angioplasty.
This PSV augmented tidal breath will be more easily trapped in the area of lung that is super compliant while having no elastic recoil.
The RePneu LVRC System is a minimally invasive device intended to improve lung function in emphysema patients by bronchoscopically implanting Nitinol coils into the lungs to compress damaged tissue (lung volume reduction) and restore elastic recoil to the healthier lung tissue.
Treatment of these lesions can be complicated by challenging anatomy that makes catheter delivery difficult, balloon slippage leading to "geographic miss", elastic recoil and the need to use high pressures to open lesions.
The transition is characterized by a strong elastic recoil after fracture.
The recovery phase of arm waving must therefore be achieved by elastic recoil.