flexion

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flexion

[′flek·shən]
(biology)
Act of bending, especially of a joint.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to our patient's need for elbow flexion strength to care for his son as soon as possible, augmentation of the repair by side-to-side suturing of the two tendon heads was performed.
This justifies the improvement in the sit-to-stand and the elbow flexion tests in this study.
Furthermore, it significantly restricts elbow flexion activity in elbow stiffness.
Elbow flexion increased from 10 degrees pretreatment to 51 degrees posttreatment, while wrist extension increased from eight to 46 degrees.
These results may be explain the decrease in elbow flexion between sets (set 1 flexed more than set 2 and set 3).
Likewise, arm kinematics for shoulder flexion/abduction and elbow flexion movements was overestimated.
In spite of the promising results, additional developments may be necessary in order to detect the individual hand joint movements, as well as to compensate the effect of elbow flexion, forearm supination, and the magnitude of grip forces during the accomplishment of movements, causing deviation of the sensor calibration curve.
The respective ROM for the right and left extremities (measured with a standard goniometer) was as follows: elbow flexion, 110[degrees] and 140[degrees]; elbow extension, -75[degrees] and 0[degrees]; forearm pronation, 85[degrees] and 85[degrees]; and forearm supination, 65[degrees] and 90[degrees].
He said that he had mild diminished strength with elbow flexion, but denied having any numbness, tingling, or discoloration of his skin.
The elbow angle was kept at median 90Adeg elbow flexion (range 80 to 1000) on dominant side and median 70Adeg flexion (range 60 to 900) on non-dominant side.
Era and collaborators (1994), found a strong positive correlation between anthropometric indicators and manual grip muscle strength, elbow flexion, knee extension, trunk flexion and extension, and also found the highest correlations with LBM.
Symptoms are aggravated by elbow flexion.8 Weakness, atrophy, and claw hand posture in the fingers may also be seen in advanced cases.