Elaeagnus

(redirected from Eleagnus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Elaeagnus

 

a genus of deciduous or evergreen trees or shrubs of the family Elaeagnaceae. The flowers are bisexual or unisexual, often four-parted, and fragrant; they are solitary or in groups of two or three in the axils. The fruit is drupaceous, mealy, and usually edible. There are more than 50 species, distributed in Asia, Southern Europe, North America, and Australia. Five species are found in the USSR, growing wild in the Caucasus and Middle Asia. Oleaster, or Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolid), a low, spiny tree with silvery elliptic leaves that sometimes grows wild, is cultivated as an ornamental, as is the hardiest North American species E. argentea. In the south, local varieties with large edible fruits are cultivated. These plants, which are used in landscaping and as a windbreak for fields, are valued for their fruit, medicinal substances, resins, tannins, and essential oils. They produce good lumber and are rich in nectar.

REFERENCES

Iakovlev-Sibiriak, I. I. Oblepikha i lokh, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1954.
Kozlovskaia, N. V. “Obzor vidov roda Elaeagnus L, vstrechaiushchikhsia na territorii SSSR.” In Trudy Botanicheskogo Instituta AN SSSR, series 1, 1958, issue 12.

V. N. GLADKOVA

References in periodicals archive ?
papilio purpureo-auratus, permanent this time since it is completely hardy, romps around the 'sea-side bed, under the silver spread of the eleagnus.
Morphometrics also allowed the establishment of correct classifications for an assemblage of polymorphic leaves of different species of Salix and their hybrids with very similar leaf forms, as well as some external species, such as Eleagnus angustifolia, whose leaves are very close in form to those of Salix.
One of the variegated eleagnus, Gilt Edge or Limelight, would also brighten things up, as would a holly such as Golden King.
The groom's table, filled with single shots of tiramisu, was placed under an arbor of curly willow accented with boughs of eleagnus.
Those easiest to move include camellia, Mexican orange blossom (Choisya ternata), dogwood (above), heather, eleagnus, forsythia, hebe, hydrangea, kerria, rosemary, potentilla, Spiraea japonica and rhododendron (below).
Q My eleagnus limelight is over 5ft high but has suddenly developed a vigorouse all-green branch.
Eleagnus ebbingei `Limelight' - Big evergreen shrub.
Most of the viburnums, with their scented winter flowers, are resilient, so are thecotoneasters, the gold and green evergreen Eleagnus pungens , skimmia,and even the deciduous weigela with numerous deep pink flowers in spring.
The Eleagnus also supplies nitrogen to the soil, which would be a reason to suspect poor fertility.
The altar was framed by two moss-covered columns presenting floral arrangements designed by Wendy Putt Arrangements included bells of Ireland, hanging amaranthus, eleagnus, white hydrangea, white delphinium, and Viburnum, while iron and glass lanterns filled the altar table.
Those easiest to move include camellia, Mexican orange blossom, dogwood, heather, eleagnus, forsythia, hebe, hydrangea, kerria, rosemary, potentilla and rhododendron.