Elis

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Elis

(ē`lĭs), region of ancient Greece, in W Peloponnesus, W of Arcadia. It was divided into three parts—Elis proper, Pisatis, and Triphylia. A plain watered by the Alpheus and the Peneus rivers, Elis was notable as a place for breeding horses and growing flax. The Olympic games were held at OlympiaOlympia,
ancient city, important center of the worship of Zeus in ancient Greece, in Elis near the Alpheus (now Alfiós) R. It was the scene of the Olympic games. The great temple of Zeus was especially celebrated for its gold and ivory statue of Zeus by Phidias—one
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. Other important cities were Pisa and Elis. The Elians were early allied with the Spartans but fell out with them in 420 B.C. As a result, Elis lost (399 B.C.) Triphylia. Elis declined after the Olympic games were suppressed in the 4th cent. A.D.

Elis

 

an ancient region in the northwestern part of the Peloponnesus, in Greece. Elis abounded in pastures and fertile valleys. The main city of the region, also called Elis, arose in the early fifth century B.C. A Greek sanctuary was located in the region at the city of Olympia, where the Olympic Games were held. In contemporary Greece, Elis is a nome whose capital is the city of Pirgos.

Elis

an ancient city-state of SW Greece, in the NW Peloponnese: site of the ancient Olympic games
References in periodicals archive ?
84) Elean designers could have chosen to depict something different, such as the Gigantomachy, which appears repeatedly as architectural sculpture on earlier buildings including the Megarian Treasury of ca.
It is implausible, moreover, that the Eleans would have celebrated their hero and the founder of the games, Pelops, with sculptures that depicted him as a cheat, (38) particularly since athletes took their oath of fair play in front of a nearby statue of Zeus (Paus.
If it is unlikely that the Eleans and other viewers had the cheating version in mind in 470, what did viewers see when they looked at the east pediment?
The late-fifth-century viewer of the east pediment would have seen Pelops, the hero of the Eleans, dressed in combat gear (Fig.
79) In order to explain this choice of myth, some scholars posit that the west pediment offers a local variant of the Centauromachy myth, and Joachim Heiden recently has argued that a genealogical link between the Thessalian Lapiths and the Eleans makes this myth particularly apt for the temple.
Nike, not dike, seems more prominent in the minds of the Eleans, victors over Pisa, and patrons of this temple, an interest also reflected in the gilt Nike (or Victory) and gilt cauldrons that once crowned the roof as akroteria (Paus.
46-47), who posits that the Eleans appropriated Athenian symbols when they adopted a democracy along the lines of that of post-471 Athens.
We would have to presume that Pausanias, contrary to his practice elsewhere, took this one detail from Thucydides and then added the account of the Elean War from elsewhere, rather than assume that he was using a self-contained account that gave the background incident to the war.