Eleanor of Castile


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Eleanor of Castile

(kăstēl`), d.1290, queen consort of Edward IEdward I,
1239–1307, king of England (1272–1307), son of and successor to Henry III. Early Life

By his marriage (1254) to Eleanor of Castile Edward gained new claims in France and strengthened the English rights to Gascony.
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 of England and daughter of Ferdinand IIIFerdinand III,
1199–1252, Spanish king of Castile (1217–52) and León (1230–52), son of Alfonso IX of León and Berenguela of Castile. At the death (1217) of her brother, Henry I of Castile, Berenguela renounced her right of succession in
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 of Castile. At her marriage (1254) she brought to Prince Edward the territories of Ponthieu and Montreuil and claims to Gascony. She went with Edward on the crusade of 1270–72 to the Holy Land, where she supposedly saved his life after he had been wounded. On their return they were both crowned (1274), Henry III having died in 1272. After her death Edward had crosses erected to mark the stages of her funeral procession from Nottinghamshire to London. Of the 12 so-called Eleanor Crosses—at Lincoln, Grantham, Stamford, Geddington, Northampton, Stony Stratford, Woburn, Dunstable, St. Albans, Waltham, Westcheap, and Charing—those at Geddington, Northampton, and Waltham are extant, though partially restored.

Eleanor of Castile

1246--90, Spanish wife of Edward I of England. Eleanor Crosses were erected at each place at which her body rested between Nottingham, where she died, and London, where she is buried
References in periodicals archive ?
The book's final chapter draws together the English and Spanish threads of the story and ties up several loose ends that all point to Magister Jacobus de Ispania as both the nephew of Eleanor of Castile and the author of the Speculum musicae.
In chapter 1 Griffin explores how this "darkness" is applied retroactively, most interestingly, to Katherine of Aragon (32-37) and to Eleanor of Castile (in chapter 2), Spanish consorts whose later reputations suffered alongside the vilification of Spain.
Rose Walker contributes chapter 4, 'Leonor of England and Eleanor of Castile: Anglo-Iberian Marriage and Cultural Exchange in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries', where she compares two similar Anglo-Iberian marriages: that of Henry II's daughter, Leonor, to Alfonso VIII of Castile with that of Eleanor of Castile and Edward, Henry III's son.
After his conquest of Wales, Edward returned to Snowdonia for a series of victory celebrations and on April 25th his queen, Eleanor of Castile, gave birth at Caernarfon Castle to a son who would eventually become his father's successor.
This plant started its life in the Far East and was brought to our attention in the middle of the 13th Century by Eleanor of Castile, mother of Edward 1.
Which English king married Eleanor of Castile at the age of 14?
By the end of the civil war he and his mother were on terms of love and deep mutual respect, but he had learned an important lesson, and neither she, nor his own wife, Eleanor of Castile, were to be permitted any overt political influence during his reign.
For example, King Alfred's mother and Eleanor of Castile are discussed in quick succession (53).
He and his brother Ralph were keen stained glass artists and collectors, responsible for the east window in St Mark's Church, Bilton and some extremely old glass in The Gable House, thought to date to the 14th century and showing the arms of Eleanor of Castile.