Electrical Ceramics

Electrical Ceramics

 

a broad group of ceramic materials used in industry (steatite ceramics, titanium ceramics, peizoelectric ceramics, and insulation porcelain) that possess the necessary strength and electrical properties (high volume and surface resistivity, high electrical strength, and a relatively small tangent of the dielectric loss angle). Mineral and other high-quality raw materials are used in the production of electrical ceramics. Sintering is achieved in tunnel and car-bottom furnaces with automatically controlled firing. Insulation porcelain is produced in greater volume than any other type of electrical ceramic.

REFERENCES

Novaia keramika. Moscow, 1969.
Avetikov, V. G., and E. I. Zinko. Magnezial’naia elektrotekhnicheskaia keramika. Moscow, 1973.
Nikulin, N. V., and V. V. Kortnev. Proizvodstvo elektrokeramicheskikh izdelii, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1976.
References in periodicals archive ?
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