Electrical system


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electrical system

[i′lek·trə·kəl ‚sis·təm]
(electricity)
System of wiring, switches, relays, and other equipment associated with receiving and distributing electricity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Electrical system

The entire apparatus for supplying and distributing electricity; including transformers, meters, cables, circuit breakers, wires, switches, fixtures and outlets.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Corrosion builds resistance that can prevent power from flowing through your electrical system.
Finally, looking even further into the future, systems of cooperation between electric cars and the electrical system should be implemented in such a way as to enable a reverse flow of electrical power, that is to say, from the electric car back to the electrical system.
It is, therefore, in the landlord's own interests to have electrical systems checked by a competent electrician every five to ten years.
When the problem isn't a fire, the standby alternator, followed by the main battery, followed by any secondary battery, is your backup electrical system, but know this: Any batteries are only as good as the last charge they took.
Once the documentation is updated, it should be revised and maintained whenever electrical system changes occur.
The utility prides itself on offering extremely reliable electric service to our customers, and will continue to take the necessary steps to improve the reliability and redundancy of our electrical system so we can meet customer needs as they continue to evolve.
As Sullivan was developing the dash, many of the electrical systems installed on company vehicles in the mine were nearing the end of their usable life.
An electromagnetic pulse is capable of shorting out any electrical system that has not been protected, or "hardened," against such damage.
American Camping Association (ACA) Standard SF-7, Electrical Evaluation, requires an annual review of the camp electrical system conducted by "qualified personnel." The standards offer the following rationale:
Of particular interest was the issue of whether 75% of the cost of the building's electrical system was tangible personal property.
The first provision limits coverage to $1,000 for electronic apparatus, while in or upon a motor vehicle, if the electronic apparatus is equipped to be operated by power from the electrical system of the vehicle while retaining its capability of being operated by other sources of power.
But consider that electrical system failures are the most common type of equipment breakdown, second only to heating and cooling system failures.