electronvolt

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electronvolt

a unit of energy equal to the work done on an electron accelerated through a potential difference of 1 volt. 1 electronvolt is equivalent to 1.602 × 10--19 joule.

Electronvolt

A unit of energy used for convenience in atomic systems. Specifically, it is the change in energy of an electron, or of any particle having a charge numerically equal to that of an electron, when it is moved through a difference of potential of 1 mks volt. Its value (in mks units) is obtained from the equation W = qV, where W is energy in joules, q the charge in coulombs, and V the potential difference in volts. For a potential difference of 1 volt and the electronic charge of 1.602 × 10-19 coulomb, the electronvolt is 1.602 × 10-19 joule. See Electron, Ionization potential

electronvolt

(i-lek-tron-vohlt ) Symbol: eV. A unit of energy equal to the energy acquired by an electron falling freely through a potential difference of one volt. It is equal to 1.6022 × 10–19 joule. High-energy electromagnetic radiation is usually referred to in terms of the energy of its photons: a photon energy of 100 eV is equivalent to a radiation frequency of 2.418 × 1016 hertz. The energies of elementary particles are usually quoted in eV; their rest masses are generally referred to in terms of their energies in eV.

electronvolt

[i′lek‚trän ‚vōlt]
(physics)
A unit of energy which is equal to the energy acquired by an electron when it passes through a potential difference of 1 volt in a vacuum; it is equal to (1.60217646±0.00000006) × 10-19 volt. Abbreviated eV.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moving at top speed, your average ant will create roughly the equivalent of one trillion electron volts.
For comparison, the energy of visible light is between 2 and 3 electron volts.
Tuesday's experiment took place at a record total collision energy of 7 billion billion electron volts and at a nano-fraction of a second slower than the speed of light in the 16.
The new results show an unexpected surplus of cosmic ray electrons at very high energy - 300-800 billion electron volts - that must come from a previously unidentified source or from the annihilation of very exotic theoretical particles used to explain dark matter.
In a milestone in the 10 billion USD Large Hadron Collider's ambitious bid to reveal details about theoretical particles and microforces, scientists at the CERN collided the beams and took measurements at a combined energy level of seven trillion electron volts.
The cartons travel to a windowless, concrete room, where they are zapped with an invisible beam carrying 10 million electron volts of energy.
Optical light, in comparison, is about 2 electron volts.
But a blip at about 126 billion electron volts signals the likely presence of a new particle.
The primary instrument is the Large Area Telescope, which detects gamma rays with energies of 20 million electron volts to greater than 300 billion electron volts.
The most plausible explanation for the high energy is that protons bouncing back and forth between the two stellar winds attain energies of at least 10 trillion electron volts.
Reports said that two proton beams circulating in alternate directions collided and reached the maximum planned energy levels of seven trillion electron volts within a few minutes.
So the Large Hadron Collider was designed to collide protons with energies exceeding several trillion electron volts.