ECPA

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ECPA

(Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986) Signed into law in 1986, the ECPA extends legal protection against wiretapping and other forms of unauthorized interception to email, cellular telephones, pagers, computer transmissions and communications provided by private communication carriers. It also explicitly allows employers to monitor communications by employees using the employers' equipment. For more information, visit www.usiia.org/legis/ecpa.html and www.eff.org.
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(21) In 2015, California enacted an Electronic Communications Privacy Act that sharply limited the ability of government authorities to seek electronic communication information for law enforcement purposes.
See The Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) Part 2: Geolocation Privacy and Surveillance: Hearing Before the Subcomm.
"Yet that's exactly what has happened with the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, which has remained virtually unchanged since it was first enacted in 1986....
Responding primarily to the need to address digital wiretapping "in light of dramatic changes in new computer and telecommunications technologies," (118) Congress passed the Electronic Communications Privacy Act in 1986.
(8.) See, e.g., Electronic Communications Privacy Act Reform: Hearing Before the Subcomm.
For example, the federal Electronic Communications Privacy Act puts restrictions on certain disclosure of the "contents of a communication" such as email, and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act makes it illegal to access a person's computer without authorization.
* Amending the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA).
(15.) A bill to amend the Electronic Communications Privacy Act was
Facebook users Matthew Campbell and Michael Hurley have brought the lawsuit against Facebook in the US, claiming the company has violated the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. The lawsuit filed by the two in the District Court for Northern California is on behalf of all Facebook members in the US who have used the site to send or receive private messages that include a URL link.
When users compose messages that include links to a third-party website, Facebook scans the content of the message, follows the link and searches for information to profile the message-sender's Web activity , violating the Electronic Communications Privacy Act and California privacy and unfair competition laws, according to the suit, Khaleej Time reported.
The plaintiffs, on behalf of all US users who have sent or received private messages that included a URL in the message, are seeking an injunction against Facebook to stop the practice, as well as statutory damages, which includes 100 dollars for each day that Facebook violated the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, per each member of the class, the report added.
When users compose messages that include links to a third-party website, Facebook scans the content of the message, follows the link and searches for information to profile the message-sender's Web activity, violating the Electronic Communications Privacy Act and California privacy and unfair competition laws, according to the suit.

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