ECPA

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ECPA

(Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986) Signed into law in 1986, the ECPA extends legal protection against wiretapping and other forms of unauthorized interception to email, cellular telephones, pagers, computer transmissions and communications provided by private communication carriers. It also explicitly allows employers to monitor communications by employees using the employers' equipment. For more information, visit www.usiia.org/legis/ecpa.html and www.eff.org.
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In October 1986, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) was approved.
The way the appeals court read the 1968 federal Wiretap Act and the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, it would be illegal to "intercept" an electronic communication, such as an e-mail message.
DIRECTV claims the defendants violated the Federal Communications Act, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (wiretap laws) and Texas state law.
operating from a shady hotel/apartment complex in San Diego, is under investigation by the FBI for possibly violating the Electronic Communications Privacy Act.
Toren represents clients in cases involving the Patent Act, Copyright Act, Lanham and Trademark Acts, the DMCA, Economic Espionage Act, Electronic Communications Privacy Act, and the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act, as well as arbitration proceedings conducted by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) regarding Internet domain names.
While the federal Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) gives employers the right to monitor all e-mail traffic and Internet activity on the company system, it does not always prevent outraged employees from filing invasion of privacy claims.
While tech companies such as Microsoft are wooing Congress to pass stricter privacy regulations, many senators have introduced bills such as the Email Privacy Act, amendment to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act and the International Communications Privacy Act, with the common goal of imposing strict regulations on access to private communications.
While the Electronic Communications Privacy Act was intended to advance consumer privacy, as technology as evolved, the level of privacy set by the law has not kept pace and, as a result, privacy protections have eroded.
Their case ultimately came down to a violation of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA).
Currently, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) is the primary means to protect electronic data from government actors.
Campbell, author of the Blue Hog Report, says Facebook uses information in private messages to target advertising to its users, violating the federal Electronic Communications Privacy Act and California's Invasion of Privacy Act.

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