cyberactivism

(redirected from Electronic advocacy)

cyberactivism

Using email, blogs and social networking sites to publicize a cause by disseminating information quickly that is unavailable through normal government and commercial news sources, which may or may not eventually catch up. Cyberactivism can help promote a cause, product, company, politician or a revolution; witness the extraordinary amount of cyberactivism in the Middle East after the turn of the century.

Known by Many Names
Cyberactivism is also called "Internet activism," "electronic advocacy," "e-campaigning," "e-activism" and "online organizing." See social networking site.
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The NDMA has also taken initiatives to exploit print, electronic and digital media forums for Disaster Risk Mitigation (DRM) and therefore, devised an electronic Advocacy and Awareness Campaigns.
Moreover, he said NDMA had taken various initiatives to exploit print, electronic and digital media forums for Disaster Risk Mitigation (DRM) and therefore, devised an electronic Advocacy and Awareness Campaigns.
Mcnutt, John and Katherine Boland, "Electronic Advocacy by Nonprofit Organizations in Social Welfare Policy", Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 28, (Dec.
Coming perspectives in the development of electronic advocacy for social policy practice.
Vogel, MSN, FNP, AOCNP, coordinator of ONS's Nurse Practitioner Special Interest Group (SIG), learned that only 3,300 ONS members--out of a total of 35,000--currently participate in ONStat, the Society's grassroots electronic advocacy network, she took action.
ONStat is the Society's grassroots electronic advocacy network through which ONS members can contact their members of Congress to advance the ONS Health Policy Agenda at the national level.
MoveOn PAC, the political arm of the electronic advocacy group MoveOn.org, was founded by liberals appalled by the Republican obsession with impeaching President Bill Clinton.
(See McNutt, 1999, for suggest ions, links, and research on electronic advocacy.)
CRI has expanded Joan Seelaus' duties as electronic advocacy manager.
One way to respond to both the emergent issues and the limitations of current techniques is to incorporate the use of electronic advocacy techniques into social work's intervention arsenal.
But does this electronic advocacy make any difference?

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