e-discovery

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e-discovery

(Electronic-DISCOVERY) Relevant evidence in a court case that resides in electronic form. It includes all types of electronic files, including Web pages, email correspondence, as well as database, word processing and spreadsheet files.

Faster than Manual Coding
Compiling electronic evidence is much faster than manual coding from paper documents as has been common in the past. Meta-data such as date, from, to and type of document can be extracted automatically from electronic files in order to create an evidence database.
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com)-- A thorough understanding of the latest electronic discovery (eDiscovery) practices, procedures, and protocols is critical to effective case management.
It attempts to explain the attorney-client privilege and work-product protection as impacted by technology in general and electronic discovery in particular as well as the costs and burdens of electronic discovery in litigation.
To effectively obtain, manage, and admit electronic discovery, plaintiff attorneys must know not only the law and procedural rules, but also the technology available to locate all relevant electronically stored information (ESI).
Electronic discovery is challenging because relevant information may exist in a variety of locations and forms.
We start off with a look at the growing issue of electronic discovery and the high-profile case of Zubulake v UBS Warburg in "The End of the Ostrich Defense.
Also, attorneys use computer forensic-based methods, or electronic discovery, when they are searching for digital evidence that will help them with their case.
a provider of electronic discovery services, unveiled recently the newest upgrades to Prevail, the state-of-the-art, Web-based electronic discovery tool, at the LegalTech New York conference.
Digital Discovery & e-Evidence (11x, $649/year), which provides "the best practices and evolving law in the field of electronic discovery for litigators, corporate counsel and forensic experts.
Beginning with the basic rules governing discovery, this book discusses the legal and practical challenges involved in e-discovery, special evidentiary issues, when protective orders to limit electronic discovery may be issued, and strategic considerations in short, everything the practitioner needs to master the use of e-discovery.
The Zubulake case shows that judges are becoming savvier about electronic discovery and data recovery, which means organizations may have difficulty claiming undue burden for discovery of poorly managed electronic records
Electronic discovery is fast becoming a critical issue for all trial lawyers, regardless of the nature of a case.

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