Socratic method

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Socratic method

Philosophy the method of instruction by question and answer used by Socrates in order to elicit from his pupils truths he considered to be implicitly known by all rational beings
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Paul to the Romanes (Cambridge: Cantrell Legge, 1611), 59-60; and Francis Turretin, Institutes of Elenctic Theology, 3 vols.
What if, beyond the appearance of a fairly elevated form of sadism, the Euthyphro shows us another instance of Socrates' elenctic care for the psuche of his interlocutor, as in his treatment of Alcibiades recounted in the Symposium?
This passage is important to Vlastos, for he takes it to supply evidence of a new Plato, one who got his start in Meno with a praise of geometry, and who then rejected the moral and elenctic philosophizing of the historical Socrates.
Wolfsdorf argues that a comprehensive survey of the early dialogues does not permit the adversarial interpretation of the elenctic method.
Consider a case in which Socrates' secondary beliefs (the premises of an elenctic episode) conflict with a definition of some virtue put forward by an interlocutor.
Moreover, if Benson is right to conclude that the elenchus tests belief sets for consistency only, then one does not acquire knowledge via elenctic examination alone.
A similar reaction affects the butts of inexperienced dialecticians such as the youths who mimic Socrates' elenctic: the victims become angry not with themselves, but with Socrates (Ap.
She is certainly right that Vlastos 'decontextualizes passages and isolates the elenctic arguments from the dialectical context of the dialogues' (8), for Socratic dialectic is much more than just elenctic arguments, as C says.
Xenophon's inclusion of the opposition between "sanity" and "madness" among (indeed, central among) those questions about which Socrates habitually conversed presents a problem for what has become a relatively standard account of the Socratic elenctic method and its relation to "Socratic Intellectualism." This is an account most centrally associated with Gregory Vlastos and his students but endorsed in one form or another by such disparate commentators as Terence Irwin, Jonathan Lear, and C.