Eleusis

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Eleusis

(ĭlo͞o`sĭs), ancient city of Attica, Greece, 12 mi (20 km) NW of Athens. Through ancient times it was the seat of the Eleusinian MysteriesEleusinian Mysteries
, principal religious mysteries of ancient Greece. The mysteries may have originated as part of an early agrarian festival peculiar to certain families in Eleusis. The Athenians later (c.600 B.C.) took over the ceremonies.
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. There was a large temple to Demeter. The Eleusinian games, also held there, were not connected with the mysteries. Excavation of the cemetery began in 1952; graves were found that date from the 7th and 8th cent. B.C. The temple and a type of theater with rock-cut seats for about 3,000 spectators were uncovered near the modern village of Eleusis.

Eleusis

 

a city in Attica, Greece, 22 km west of Athens.

Eleusis was settled in the Neolithic age; in the second millennium B.C. it was the capital of one of the Achaean states. The existing remains of defensive walls, a palace, a royal tomb, and burials of nobles indicate the important role of Eleusis in the 16th to 12th centuries B.C In the first millennium B.C the city was the center of the cult of Demeter and Persephone and the place where the Eleusinian mysteries were celebrated.

Excavations begun in 1882 uncovered a section of the Sacred Way leading from Athens to Eleusis and the remains of sanctuaries dating from the sixth century B.C. to the third century A.D. Architectural monuments and complexes have been only partially preserved. They include a necropolis with tholi and a megaron (both from the 15th—13th centuries B.C.); a sanctuary containing the ruins of telesterions (meeting halls for the mystery cult), built one above another in the age of Pericles (principal architect Ictinus) and under other rulers; the Small Propylaea (c. 40 B.C.); the Great Propylaea (second half of the second century A.D.); and Roman structures—two triumphal arches and the Temple of Artemis.

Aeschylus was born in Eleusis circa 525 B.C In A.D. 396 the city was destroyed by the Goths. An archaeological museum is located in Eleusis.

REFERENCES

Noack, F. Eleusis, vols. 1–2. Berlin-Leipzig, 1927.
Kourouniotes, K. Eleusis: A Guide to the Excavations and Museum. Athens, 1934.
Mylonas, G. E. Eleusis and the Eleusinian Mysteries. Princeton, 1961.

Eleusis

a town in Greece, in Attica about 23 km (14 miles) west of Athens, of which it is now an industrial suburb
References in periodicals archive ?
Persephone's return gives rise to the establishment of the Eleusinian Mysteries that offer some kind of hope in the permanent absence that is death.
Vol 1: From the Stone Age to the Eleusinian mysteries, Trask WR, trans.
Among the topics are public sacrifice in Roman Athens, cultic and social dynamics in the Eleusinian sanctuary under the empire, Trajan and Hadrian's reorganization of the agonistic associations in Rome, some thoughts on the cult of the Pantheon (all the gods) in the cities and sanctuaries of Roman Greece, and emperor worship and Greek leagues: the organization of supra-civic imperial cult in the Roman East.
Howard was also searching for the equally mysterious mind-expanding plant-derived drink Kykeon - swigged by the Ancient Greeks during the climax of the baffling Eleusinian Mysteries - which gave amazing visions of the afterlife.
Here man, the noblest clay, the most precious marble, is kneaded and carved and, to the accompaniment of the chisel-blows of the Dionysiac world-artist, the call of the Eleusinian Mysteries rings out: 'Fall ye to the ground, ye millions?
(9) Later still, Hadrian tells of his initiation into the Eleusinian mysteries, emphasising the intense emotion experienced in the company of his fellow devotees:
Iphigeneia Leventi ("The relief statue base of Nummius Nigreinos, sacred herald of the Eleusinian mysteries.
Earlier discussions have interpreted Makron's representation of Dionysos as celebrating the god's local cult and festivals at Eleusis, just as the Mission of Triptolemos on the obverse celebrates the Eleusinian Mysteries of Demeter.
McHaney takes Slabey's identification further to suggest that the first scene, in which Horace Benbow and Popeye confront each other at the spring, parallels through word choice and theme Frazer's engagement with the King of the Wood guarding the sacred grove of Diana; that multiple characters in Sanctuary reflect The Golden Bough's representations of other god-kings; and that it is "this combination of many rituals into one ritual and many gods into one god that Faulkner borrows as he unfolds the perverse Eleusinian Mystery into which Temple Drake is so rudely forced" (225).
In her latest book, she turns her attention to the tale of Demeter and Persephone and the Eleusinian Mysteries-the religious rites that sprang up around the story and were practiced by both men and women in ancient Greece for nearly 2,000 years.
Known as the Telesterion, or Hall of the Initiates, this was where all Eleusinian pilgrims gathered.
The cyclical change of seasons also brings to mind the Hellenic mystical ritual, the Eleusinian Mysteries (c.