Eleusis

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Eleusis

(ĭlo͞o`sĭs), ancient city of Attica, Greece, 12 mi (20 km) NW of Athens. Through ancient times it was the seat of the Eleusinian MysteriesEleusinian Mysteries
, principal religious mysteries of ancient Greece. The mysteries may have originated as part of an early agrarian festival peculiar to certain families in Eleusis. The Athenians later (c.600 B.C.) took over the ceremonies.
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. There was a large temple to Demeter. The Eleusinian games, also held there, were not connected with the mysteries. Excavation of the cemetery began in 1952; graves were found that date from the 7th and 8th cent. B.C. The temple and a type of theater with rock-cut seats for about 3,000 spectators were uncovered near the modern village of Eleusis.

Eleusis

 

a city in Attica, Greece, 22 km west of Athens.

Eleusis was settled in the Neolithic age; in the second millennium B.C. it was the capital of one of the Achaean states. The existing remains of defensive walls, a palace, a royal tomb, and burials of nobles indicate the important role of Eleusis in the 16th to 12th centuries B.C In the first millennium B.C the city was the center of the cult of Demeter and Persephone and the place where the Eleusinian mysteries were celebrated.

Excavations begun in 1882 uncovered a section of the Sacred Way leading from Athens to Eleusis and the remains of sanctuaries dating from the sixth century B.C. to the third century A.D. Architectural monuments and complexes have been only partially preserved. They include a necropolis with tholi and a megaron (both from the 15th—13th centuries B.C.); a sanctuary containing the ruins of telesterions (meeting halls for the mystery cult), built one above another in the age of Pericles (principal architect Ictinus) and under other rulers; the Small Propylaea (c. 40 B.C.); the Great Propylaea (second half of the second century A.D.); and Roman structures—two triumphal arches and the Temple of Artemis.

Aeschylus was born in Eleusis circa 525 B.C In A.D. 396 the city was destroyed by the Goths. An archaeological museum is located in Eleusis.

REFERENCES

Noack, F. Eleusis, vols. 1–2. Berlin-Leipzig, 1927.
Kourouniotes, K. Eleusis: A Guide to the Excavations and Museum. Athens, 1934.
Mylonas, G. E. Eleusis and the Eleusinian Mysteries. Princeton, 1961.

Eleusis

a town in Greece, in Attica about 23 km (14 miles) west of Athens, of which it is now an industrial suburb
References in periodicals archive ?
141-142), the site of a temple dedicated to the Eleusinian mysteries.
Mummy wheat; Egyptian influence on the Homeric view of the afterlife and the Eleusinian mysteries.
The first two chapters explain in detail theoria as a cultural and religious practice divided into three parts: first, the journey (usually abroad) to an oracle, sanctuary, or sacred festival, whether made as a private citizen or as an official representative of one's polis; second, the observing of the games associated with the festival, and/or participating in sacrifices and rituals, such as initiation in the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which one experiences a "theoric gaze" (p.
But the extraordinary rarity with which foreigners were admitted to citizenship in ancient Athens, Pericles' proposal (which was adopted) to remove from the citizenship rolls those who had only one parent born in Athens, the requirement that only those who spoke Greek were permitted to participate in the Eleusinian Mysteries, and the conviction of Socrates on the grounds of atheism and corrupting the youth--all seem to argue otherwise.
Study of narrative resemblances also governs Doreen Fowler's reflection on Eleusinian mysteries and Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury.
Four years later, in the winter of 416, another crucial event in the life histories of Athens and Alkibiades occurs, the profaning of the Eleusinian mysteries.
The poet of the Hymn to Demeter emphasizes Demeter's grief and rage at Zeus's arbitrary and violent severance of the matrilineal link, her conditional victory over Zeus and Hades with the return of Persephone, and the ultimate transcendence of her suffering with the institution of the Eleusinian Mysteries.
as "mystery" rather than Shorey's "pledge of secrecy," to coincide with Plato's subsequent reference to Eleusinian mystery sacrifice.
For women writers, then, Southern race relations look "less like an Eleusinian mystery and more like a repetitive, everyday terror--a set of practices so incessantly, so boringly enacted within the everyday that they seem to be hiding in plain sight" (p.
His first book, A Light from Eleusis: A Study of Ezra Pound's Cantos (Clarendon Press, 1979), is a biography, as it were, of the poem; it reads The Cantos as a "failed epic" and its mythos as a reinterpretation of Odysseus' descent in light of the Eleusinian mystery ritual, thus bridging Dante's dream vision of the paradisal world with the Homeric wanderings to the underworld.
Known as the Telesterion, or Hall of the Initiates, this was where all Eleusinian pilgrims gathered.
And, as Marie Marianetti suggests in Religion and Politics in Aristophanes' Clouds, Aristophanes also took the "opportunity [in The Clouds] to caricature the cult-based, religio-philosophical views of the Pythagoreans," the "mystery cults, with the exception of the Eleusinian mysteries, [being] foreign in origin, style, and spirit.