Eleutherococcus


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Eleutherococcus

 

a genus of shrubs of the family Araliaceae. The plants usually have thorny shoots and digitate-compound leaves. There are about 15 species, distributed in Asia, from Japan to the Himalayas. The USSR has one species, E. senticosus, growing in the Far East. A shrub measuring 1.5-3 m in height, it is used as an ornamental and medicinal plant. Liquid extracts of its roots are prescribed as stimulants and tonics to treat exhaustion, particularly after severe wasting diseases.

REFERENCES

Brekhman, I. I. Eleuterokokk. Leningrad, 1968.
Dardymov, I. V. Zhen’shen’, eleuterokokk. (K mekhanizmu biologicheskogo deistviia). Moscow, 1976.
References in periodicals archive ?
Application of Mechanochemical Pretreatment to Aqueous Extraction of Isofraxidin from Eleutherococcus Senticosus," Society, pp: 6584-6589
Families Species Parts of the plant Schisandraceae Schisandra chinensis Vine, berry, leaf Saxifragaceae Bergenia pacifica Leaf Berberidaceae Berberis amurensis Leaf Caprifoliaceae Viburnum sargentii Leaf, berry Grossulariaceae Ribes mandshuricum Leaf Rutaceae Phellodendron amurense Fruit Rosaceae Aronia melanocarpa Fruit Rosa acicularis Fruit Araliaceae Eleutherococcus senticosus Leaf Panax ginseng Leaf, root Table 2: Morphometry of phytoliths of Berberis amurensis.
A new source of AChE and BuChE inhibitors can be secondary metabolites present in Eleutherococcus species, which are native to Eastern Asia, the Himalayas, and Northeastern Russia.
Herbs that fall into the general category of adaptogens include (but are not limited to) Rhodiola rosea, Schisandra chinensis, Eleutherococcus senticosus, and Glycyrrhiza gla bra (licorice root).
For stress, the recommended ginseng is Eleutherococcus Senticosus, known as Siberian ginseng.
Previous work in our laboratory indicated that mechanochemical pretreatment significantly increased the yield of bioactive compounds from two herbs, Eleutherococcus senticosus and Crataegus pinnatifida (Liu et al.
There are various herbs that can be used as adaptogens but the most common ones this paper will focus on are Withania somnifera (withania), Panax ginseng (Korean ginseng), Eleutherococcus senticosus (Siberian ginseng), Schisandra chinensis (schisandra), Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice), Rhodiola rosea (rhodiola), Bacopa monniera (brahmi) and Centella asiatica (gotu kola).
A FOR a kick start, take 20 drops of eleutherococcus in a little water twice daily before meals.
IT LOOKS like a piece of ginger that's been stuck at the back of the fridge for too long, but Eleutherococcus is the wonder herb which has actors, athletes and wannabe astronauts swearing to its near magical powers.
This term applied to a plant Eleutherococcus senticosus, which isn't ginseng, but a cheap, inferior substitute.
isolated phlorizin from Eleutherococcus senticosus and studied its potential on human keratinocytes and skin equivalents.