homocysteine

(redirected from Elevated homocysteine)
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homocysteine

[¦hä·mə′sis·tēn]
(biochemistry)
C4H9O2NS An amino acid formed in animals by demethylation of methionine.
References in periodicals archive ?
34) This finding makes sense based on the fact that modestly elevated homocysteine does not usually create arterial disease early in life; i.
Thus, preventing Pb exposure may not only reduce the risk of elevated homocysteine, but among those who have been exposed, higher consumption of methyl-donor nutrients may partially mitigate the influence of Pb on homocysteine.
Some studies showed that elevated homocysteine levels are related to poor ulcer healing (9,10).
Both elevated homocysteine and low HDL cholesterol levels were significantly and independently associated with twice the risk of preterm birth, Dr.
Elevated homocysteine can be caused by a vitamin [B.
But two recent studies reveal a possible connection between moderately elevated homocysteine levels and fracture risk, particularly in people over age 55.
Metabolism of homocysteine thiolactone in human cell cultures: possible mechanism for pathological consequences of elevated homocysteine levels.
The good news is, if elevated homocysteine levels are causing osteoporosis, supplementing with B vitamins that have been shown to lower serum homocysteine levels (especially folic acid) may turn out to be an easy way for our aging population to avoid osteoporosis.
Since then, physicians have found that even moderately elevated homocysteine readings increase people's risk of heart disease.
The CRIC study will provide a review to-date of the relative known risk factors for kidney disease and heart disease-diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, tobacco use, and inactivity-and factors suspected of contributing to these conditions-chronic inflammation, infection, oxidative stress, elevated homocysteine, and fibrinogen.
12], can lower serum homocysteine levels, and vitamin supplementation is currently being investigated as a preventive treatment for patients with elevated homocysteine levels who are at risk for arterial disease.

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