homocysteine

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homocysteine

[¦hä·mə′sis·tēn]
(biochemistry)
C4H9O2NS An amino acid formed in animals by demethylation of methionine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies have shown positive associations between elevated homocysteine levels and incidence of Alzheimer's disease and dementia.
Previous studies also indicated a relationship between elevated homocysteine levels and the risk of CAD (coronary, heart, cerebrovascular, and peripheral artery diseases).
One solution is to suppress their elevated homocysteine.
There is evidence from laboratory and clinical studies that elevated Homocysteine (eHcy), exerts direct toxic effects on both the vascular and nervous systems.
Thus, preventing Pb exposure may not only reduce the risk of elevated homocysteine, but among those who have been exposed, higher consumption of methyl-donor nutrients may partially mitigate the influence of Pb on homocysteine.
Research suggests that over time, elevated homocysteine may disturb normal brain processes, lead to the accumulation of beta-amyloid and tau proteins, lead to lesions in the brain's white matter, and promote the death of brain cells and brain atrophy.
Elevated homocysteine and C-reactive protein levels are implicated in cardiovascular disease and also increasingly under scrutiny in Alzheimer's disease.
However, with folic acid, vitamins B6 and B12 widely available and very inexpensive, management of patients with cardiovascular diseases due to elevated homocysteine becomes easier and very affordable especially to the population in developing countries such as ours.
Elevated homocysteine levels occur in five to seven percent of the population1.
Some evidence suggests that vitamin B12 deficiency can cause elevated homocysteine levels, while supplementation of vitamin B12 shows a seven percent reduction in homocysteine concentrations, according to a meta-analysis of a number of randomized trials.
The team's unpublished research also suggests a link between excess vitamin D and elevated homocysteine levels, another danger sign for cardiovascular disease.
Earlier studies have reported that elevated homocysteine levels are determined in plasma, aqueous humor, and tear fluid in patients with PEX.

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