elevation

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elevation,

vertical distance from a datum plane, usually mean sea levelsea level,
the level of the sea, which serves as the datum used for measurement of land elevations and ocean depths. Theoretically, one would expect sea level to be a fixed and permanent horizontal surface on the face of the earth, and as a starting approximation, this is true.
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 to a point above the earth. Often used synonymously with altitudealtitude,
vertical distance of an object above some datum plane, such as mean sea level or a reference point on the earth's surface. It is usually measured by the reduction in atmospheric pressure with height, as shown on a barometer or altimeter.
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, elevation is the height on the earth's surface and altitude, the height in space above the surface. The elevation of a feature is calculated through such surveying techniques as trigonometric triangulation and aerial photogrammetry. Elevation is represented by using contourscontour
or contour line,
line on a topographic map connecting points of equal elevation above or below mean sea level. It is thus a kind of isopleth, or line of equal quantity.
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 of equal elevation lines, three-dimensional computer graphics representation, or molded three-dimensional plastic models.

Elevation

A drawing showing the vertical elements of a building, either interior or exterior, as a direct projection to a vertical plane.

Elevation

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Elevation is the angular distance of a celestial body above the horizon. An elevated planet in a natal chart, especially if it is near the midheaven and in the tenth house, is said to exert a particularly strong influence on the entire chart. In traditional astrology, elevated malefic planets, especially when elevated above the Sun and Moon, were said to exert an unfavorable influence over the entire chart. Modern astrologers have largely rejected this interpretation. For instance, a well-aspected Saturn (traditionally considered the Greater Malefic) placed in the tenth house is in the house of its accidental dignity, and although this placement may indicate delay, it also indicates ultimate success (should other factors support this interpretation) in one’s profession.

Elevation

 

a part of the earth’s surface characterized by its elevation in relation to surrounding areas (for example, the Valdai Hills, the Central Russian Uplands). Convention-ally, an elevation is defined as an area with an absolute height of over 200 m and is contrasted to lowlands.


Elevation

 

a term used in classical dance. Elevation, as defined by A. Ia. Vaganova, consists of two concepts: elevation proper (the height of a jump) and ballon (the ability to maintain a pose as if suspended in the air).

elevation

[‚el·ə′vā·shən]
(engineering)
Vertical distance to a point or object from sea level or some other datum.
(graphic arts)
A graphic projection of a machine or structure on a vertical plane without perspective.
(ordnance)
In antiaircraft artillery, a term sometimes applied to the angular height.

elevation

1. A drawing showing the vertical elements of a building, either exterior or interior, as a direct projection to a vertical plane.
2. The vertical distance above or below some established reference level.

elevation

elevation
i. The vertical distance of a point or a level on the surface of the earth, measured from the mean sea level. For airfields, it is above mean sea level (ICAO).
ii. The angle in the vertical plane between an object and the natural horizon. See angle of elevation.

elevation

1. a drawing to scale of the external face of a building or structure
2. the external face of a building or structure
3. a ballet dancer's ability to leap high
4. RC Church the lifting up of the Host at Mass for adoration
5. Astronomy another name for altitude
References in classic literature ?
At one time, however, their elevation is to be a necessary consequence of the smallness of the representative body; at another time it is to be effected by depriving the people at large of the opportunity of exercising their right of suffrage in the choice of that body.
Before the sentiments impressed on their minds by the mode of their elevation can be effaced by the exercise of power, they will be compelled to anticipate the moment when their power is to cease, when their exercise of it is to be reviewed, and when they must descend to the level from which they were raised; there forever to remain unless a faithful discharge of their trust shall have established their title to a renewal of it.
For some days past, Captain Bonneville had been made sensible of the great elevation of country into which he was gradually ascending by the effect of the dryness and rarefaction of the atmosphere upon his wagons.
At noon, to-day, ascended to an elevation of nearly 25,000 feet, by discharging ballast.
The intense melancholy which seems to well up, perforce, to the surface of all the poet's cheerful sayings about his grave, we find thrilling us to the soul--while there is the truest poetic elevation in the thrill.
During his passage over the sea the doctor deemed it best to keep at his present elevation.
In that unearthly illumination he saw near him, but apparently in the air at a considerable elevation, the figure of his wife, clad in her night-clothing and holding to her breast the figure of his child.
He offers false strength to the body, false elevation to the spirit, making things seem what they are not and vastly fairer than what they are.
During the periods of subsidence there would probably be much extinction of life; during the periods of elevation, there would be much variation, but the geological record would then be least perfect.
Our intention, in short, is to introduce our heroine with the utmost solemnity in our power, with an elevation of stile, and all other circumstances proper to raise the veneration of our reader.
Therefore, do they long so much for a friend, and for his elevation.
For a distance extending nearly 1500 miles east and west, and 600 north and south, there is scarcely an elevation worthy to be called a mountain.