Elgin Marbles

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Elgin Marbles

(ĕl`gĭn), ancient sculptures taken from Athens to England in 1806 by Thomas Bruce, 7th earl of ElginElgin, Thomas Bruce, 7th earl of,
1766–1841, British diplomat. He served on diplomatic missions to Vienna, Brussels, Berlin, and Constantinople.
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; other fragments exist in several European museums. Consisting of much of the surviving frieze and other sculptures from the ParthenonParthenon
[Gr.,=the virgin's place], temple sacred to Athena, on the acropolis at Athens. Built under Pericles between 447 B.C. and 432 B.C., it is the culminating masterpiece of Greek architecture. Ictinus and Callicrates were the architects and Phidias supervised the sculpture.
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, a caryatidcaryatid
, a sculptured female figure serving as an ornamental support in place of a column or pilaster. It was a frequently used motif in architecture, furniture, and garden sculpture during the Renaissance, the 18th cent., and notably, the classic revival of the 19th cent.
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, and a column from the ErechtheumErechtheum
[for Erechtheus], Gr. Erechtheion, temple in Pentelic marble, on the Acropolis at Athens. One of the masterpieces of Greek architecture, it was constructed between c.421 B.C. and 405 B.C. to replace an earlier temple to Athena destroyed by the Persians.
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, they were sold to the British government in 1816 and are now on view in the British Museum. Since then, the Greek government has sought the return of the marbles. Although British claims are based on Elgin's purchase of the sculptures, Greece has contested this, and its position has many supporters.

Bibliography

See T. Vrettos, The Elgin Affair (1997).

Elgin Marbles

A collection of sculptures, taken from the Parthenon in Athens by Lord Elgin; preserved in the British Museum since 1816. The finest surviving work of Greek sculptural decoration of the Classical age; the collection includes a number of metopes, fragments of pediment statues, and an extended series of blocks carved in low relief of the cella frieze.
References in periodicals archive ?
She said: "Just like the Greeks want their Elgin Marbles back, so we want Winnie the Pooh back, along with all his splendid friends.
That comparison with the Elgin marbles and Titians clearly recognises the global importance of the Red Lady.
The campaigners have paid National Museums Liverpool pounds 800 to hire The Wa lker for the event and plan to carry out publicity interviews in front of rare copies of the Elgin Marbles in one of the gallery's sculpture rooms.
The debate over the future of the Elgin Marbles continues but the British Government looks no nearer to handing over the Parthenon treasures.
It has been selected to allow the campaigners, who wish to see the 2,500-year- old marbles returned to Greece, to hold publicity intervie ws in front of rare copies of the Elgin Marbles housed in the Walker's main sculpture room.
Mr Richard said, 'Just like the Elgin Marbles were taken from Greece this very important piece of history was taken from us by the English.
GREECE: Two British Olympic medalists have urged that the Elgin Marbles should be returned to Greece by the British Museum.
THE most controversial of all remnants from our colonial past, the Elgin marbles, still draw fierce passion from the people of Greece.
GEORGE Clooney was backed by Bill Murray last night in his call on Britain to return the Elgin Marbles.
STEVEN Gerrard, rain forests, wartime convoys and the Elgin Marbles are covered by Merseyside MPs in early day motions.
Elgin Marbles (c Lujain-Bold Gem, by Never So Bold)
An act of friendship, atonement and an expression of faith in the future of the cradle of democracy would be so, well just so damned classy" Entertainer Stephen Fry, above, urging Britain to return the Elgin Marbles in Olympics year "There are those who really do care about achievement and success and changing the world and there are those who just want the bit of paper off their desk and on to somebody else's desk so they don't pick up any blame" Labour MP Margaret Hodge, chairwoman of the Public Accounts Committee, sums up civil servants "Am I insecure?