Elgin Marbles


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Elgin Marbles

(ĕl`gĭn), ancient sculptures taken from Athens to England in 1806 by Thomas Bruce, 7th earl of ElginElgin, Thomas Bruce, 7th earl of,
1766–1841, British diplomat. He served on diplomatic missions to Vienna, Brussels, Berlin, and Constantinople.
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; other fragments exist in several European museums. Consisting of much of the surviving frieze and other sculptures from the ParthenonParthenon
[Gr.,=the virgin's place], temple sacred to Athena, on the acropolis at Athens. Built under Pericles between 447 B.C. and 432 B.C., it is the culminating masterpiece of Greek architecture. Ictinus and Callicrates were the architects and Phidias supervised the sculpture.
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, a caryatidcaryatid
, a sculptured female figure serving as an ornamental support in place of a column or pilaster. It was a frequently used motif in architecture, furniture, and garden sculpture during the Renaissance, the 18th cent., and notably, the classic revival of the 19th cent.
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, and a column from the ErechtheumErechtheum
[for Erechtheus], Gr. Erechtheion, temple in Pentelic marble, on the Acropolis at Athens. One of the masterpieces of Greek architecture, it was constructed between c.421 B.C. and 405 B.C. to replace an earlier temple to Athena destroyed by the Persians.
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, they were sold to the British government in 1816 and are now on view in the British Museum. Since then, the Greek government has sought the return of the marbles. Although British claims are based on Elgin's purchase of the sculptures, Greece has contested this, and its position has many supporters.

Bibliography

See T. Vrettos, The Elgin Affair (1997).

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Elgin Marbles

A collection of sculptures, taken from the Parthenon in Athens by Lord Elgin; preserved in the British Museum since 1816. The finest surviving work of Greek sculptural decoration of the Classical age; the collection includes a number of metopes, fragments of pediment statues, and an extended series of blocks carved in low relief of the cella frieze.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Although no doubt there is tacit support for their return to the Parthenon, the Cyprus government clearly can't make a fuss about the Elgin Marbles without being called to answer why Cyprus doesn't fight for some of its stolen unique and priceless artefacts.
"It's the same question with the Elgin Marbles and all these other things.
Tracing the Parthenon sculptures' eventful history over two millennia, he goes on: 'There is a sense to me of the Elgin Marbles being fragmented and lost.
Greece, which wants the return of a collection of ancient Greek sculptures known as the Elgin Marbles from the British Museum, and Italy would be among the countries invited.
The demand follows the decades-old tussle between Britain and Greece over the Elgin Marbles.
In his later years Dassin was active in the Greek drive to return the Elgin Marbles to Athens from the British Museum.
For example: The student will actively investigate the ethical issues surrounding the Elgin Marbles. The adverb actively allows for a range of participation that can be measured, while the verb investigate allows for a variety of ways for the learning to occur.
Ricardo Elia once declared to me that he wanted to make collecting as "socially distasteful as smoking cigarettes, wearing fur, or eating an endangered species." Lord Renfrew has accused major American museums of "stimulating much of the looting in the world." One Park Avenue collector told me he felt like donning a "flak jacket in public, like I was an abortion doctor." A new clamor arose concerning the world's most notorious case of "cultural plunder": the Elgin Marbles, sculptures from the Parthenon that Britain's Lord Elgin purchased in the early 19th century and shipped back to England.
2000 The British Museum's Royal Court was re-opened with a royal dinner - the Greek Ambassador boycotted the event in protest over the Elgin Marbles.
When they had already got them, as was the case with the British Museum and the Elgin Marbles, Duveen would still have liked to make an appearance.
The appropriation of the Aboriginal culture of the Greeks by one group of imperialists after another is symbolized by the transfer of the Elgin Marbles to the British Museum in London.
But it doesn't look hopeful: The Greek Government has continually been rebuffed over its pleas to the museum to hand over the ancient Elgin Marbles. ABN