Lubumbashi

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Lubumbashi

Lubumbashi (lo͞obo͞ombäˈshē), city (1984 pop. 564,830), capital of Haut-Katanga province, SE Congo (Kinshasa), near the border with Zambia. The second largest city of the country, it is a commercial and industrial center. Copper is smelted there, and textiles, food products and beverages, printed materials, and bricks are manufactured. Founded in 1910, Lubumbashi was known as Elisabethville and prospered with the development of the region's copper-mining industry. It also serves as a distribution center for other minerals, including cobalt, zinc, tin, and coal. Lubumbashi was the capital of the secessionist state of Katanga (1960–63) and was the scene of bloody strife between UN troops and Katangan forces. The city is the site of a university, a regional museum, and a modern airport. It is connected by rail to several SE and central Congo cities and to Zambia.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lubumbashi

 

(Elisabethville until 1966), a city in the Republic of Zaïre; administrative center of the province of Shaba (Katanga), located on the Lubumbashi River (Luapula basin), near the Zambia border. Population, 318,000 (1970). The city is a highway junction and has a railroad station and an international airport. It is a large industrial and commercial center, with a copper-smelting works and enterprises of the food-processing, textile, chemical, machine-building, and other industries.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Lubumbashi

a city in the S Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Za?re): founded in 1910 as a copper-mining centre; university (1955). Pop.: 1 102 000 (2005 est.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Delegates travelled from Western and Eastern Europe, North America, and from the newly created section in Elisabethville, which had been established directly after the end of the secession.
He added: "I know members of Trooper Mullins' family would welcome an opportunity to travel to Lubumbashi, as Elisabethville is now known, to visit where Trooper Mullins died.
Aussi la toponymie en Afrique atteste-t-elle l'efficacite de cette politique : Johannesburg (en Afrique du Sud), Leopoldville (Kinshasa), Elisabethville (Lubumbashi), Brazzaville (au Congo-Brazza), Saint-Louis (au Senegal), etc.
And in the Belgian Congo, Catholic missionaries who had begun showing films to urban Congolese in Leopoldville as early as 1910 soon extended the privilege to black residents of Stanleyville and Elisabethville.(11) Although opinion among whites as to the wisdom of allowing Africans to view films was divided in the Belgian Congo (in 1945, for instance, colonial legislation was enacted specifically to restrict native Congolese from seeing commercial films, most of which were American imports), the AMPP of the late 1930s must be seen within the context of an emerging consensus among many missionaries and colonial officials that cinema might, in some way, play a positive role in dramatically transforming the life of indigenous people.
Leodine, a young girl growing up in the posh suburb of Elisabethville in 1950s occupied Africa, is shocked when she learns of her African lineage.
Plus ou moins directement, les peintres l'inscrivent dans une galerie de heros liberateurs, tous modernes : Simon Kimbangu (le hasard veut que les deux aient trouve la mort a Elisabethville), le chef songye Kamanda wa Kamanda, pendu en 1936 pour avoir demande l'independance dit le recit oral, enfin, a la fin des annees 1990, Laurent-Desire Kabila.
Ndola is at the southern end of the copper belt which stretches 500 kilometers northwest to Kitwe and Chingola, across the border into Katanga province, Congo (Shaba province, Zaire), and west through the towns of Lubumbashi (Elisabethville), Likasi and Kolwezi.
(16) La Philosophie bantoue (Elisabethville: Lovania, 1945; Paris: Presence Africaine 1949), English translation Bantu Philosophy (Paris: Presence Africaine, 1959).
In 1947, Pierre Romain-Desfosses, French naval officer and amateur painter, opened a "hanger" in Elisabethville, a sort of independent painting studio where he received young Congolese students.