Elisheba

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Elisheba

(ēlĭsh`əbə) [Heb.,=worshiper of God; Elizabeth is a Greek form], in the Bible, Aaron's wife.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those at the ceremony included Elisheva Lernau, aged 91.
A corollary literature looks to the history of Jewish calendars, almanacs, and time-keeping: Elisheva Carlebach, Palaces of Time: Jewish Calendar and Culture in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2011); Michael Satlow, "Jewish Time in Early-Nineteenth-Century America: A Study of Moses Lopez's Calendar," American Jewish Archives 65, nos.
Though she identified with Jews to a great extent, Elisheva remained "a divided soul.
Elisheva Heit, whose flower shop window was smashed on the eve of its grand opening, said "I don't understand how this would bring the poor guy back to life.
Michael Guttman represented the seller, Elisheva Fulton 26 LLC and Ben Khakshoor represented the buyer, a private investor.
According to Johanna Catherine Maclean, loana Popovici, and Elisheva Rachel Stern in "Health insurance expansions and provider behavior: evidence from substance use disorder providers" (National Bureau of Economic Research working paper no.
7) Elisheva SADAN (1997) recupera as origens deste conceito relacionandoo as obras de Barbara Solomon (1976, 1985) que enfatizam o empoderamento como metodo para o trabalho social com comunidades oprimidas de afro-americanos; Peter Berger e Richard Neuhaus (1977), que usam o termo para propor um caminho para a melhoria de servicos de bem-estar social; e Julian Rappaport (1981), que vai dar maior sustentacao teorica, relacionando o empoderamento as politicas sociais direcionadas aos grupos 'sem poder'.
11) Elisheva Carlebach, Philip Nothaft, and David Frick have each explored how Jewish-Christian relations were often mediated through calendars and other means of measuring time.
Stranger Woman," by Elisheva Greenbaum, 2000 Ever since I learned to tie my shoelaces, (8) I've been tailing the human race.
Part II ("Limits of Biology: Bodily Purity and Religiosity") includes essays by Marion Katz, Charlotte Elisheva Fonrobert, and Soraya Tremayne that address power relations in Islamic and Jewish culture relating to the body and sexuality.
In Lies, First Person, by Gail Hareven (translated from the Hebrew by Dalya Bilu), sisters Elinor and Elisheva have their lives changed forever when Elisheva is sexually assaulted by their uncle, Aaron Gotthilf.
JISA, Harriet, REILLY, Judy, VERHOEVEN, Ludo, BARUCH, Elisheva, ROSADO, Elisa.