Elizabeth Woodville


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Woodville, Elizabeth,

1437–92, queen consort of Edward IVEdward IV,
1442–83, king of England (1461–70, 1471–83), son of Richard, duke of York. He succeeded to the leadership of the Yorkist party (see Roses, Wars of the) after the death of his father in Wakefield in 1460.
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 of England. She was the daughter of Richard Woodville (later the 1st Earl RiversRivers, Richard Woodville, 1st Earl,
d. 1469, English nobleman. He was knighted (1426) by Henry VI and acquired wealth and power by marrying (c.1436) Jacquetta of Luxemburg, widow of John of Lancaster, duke of Bedford.
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). Her first husband, Sir John Grey, was killed fighting on the Lancastrian side at the battle of St. Albans (1461) in the Wars of the Roses. By him she had two sons, Thomas, 1st marquess of Dorset, and Richard. Edward IV married her in secret in 1464, partly because the powerful Richard Neville, earl of WarwickWarwick, Richard Neville, earl of
, 1428–71, English nobleman, called the Kingmaker. Through his grandfather, Ralph Neville, 1st earl of Westmorland, he had connections with the house of Lancaster; he was also the nephew of Cecily Neville, wife of Richard, duke of York.
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, had other marriage plans for him and partly because of Elizabeth's Lancastrian connections. The marriage was soon made public, however, and Elizabeth's large family received numerous royal favors. At the death (1483) of Edward IV, Richard, duke of Gloucester (later Richard IIIRichard III,
1452–85, king of England (1483–85), younger brother of Edward IV. Created duke of Gloucester at Edward's coronation (1461), he served his brother faithfully during Edward's lifetime—fighting at Barnet and Tewkesbury and later invading Scotland.
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), seized custody of the young Edward VEdward V,
1470–83?, king of England (1483), elder son of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville. His father's death (1483) left the boy king the pawn of the conflicting ambitions of his paternal uncle, the duke of Gloucester (later Richard III) and his maternal uncle, Earl
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, Elizabeth's eldest son by the late king, and destroyed the power of the Woodvilles (Elizabeth's brother the 2d Earl Rivers and son Richard Grey were executed). The queen mother again took sanctuary in Westminster and soon surrendered her second son by Edward, Richard, duke of York, to Gloucester. He then placed both boys in the Tower of London and declared them illegitimate, asserting that Elizabeth's marriage to Edward was voided by a precontract of marriage on Edward's part. (The boys were subsequently murdered.) After Henry VII seized the throne from Richard, he married (1486) Elizabeth's eldest daughter, who was also named Elizabeth.

Elizabeth Woodville:

see Woodville, ElizabethWoodville, Elizabeth,
1437–92, queen consort of Edward IV of England. She was the daughter of Richard Woodville (later the 1st Earl Rivers). Her first husband, Sir John Grey, was killed fighting on the Lancastrian side at the battle of St.
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
When Edward IV suddenly died, Richard took his young son Edward V, and murdered his bodyguards including the brother and son by a previous marriage of Edward IV's widow, Elizabeth Woodville.
Two sons by his wife Elizabeth Woodville, the first commoner to become queen, consolidated Edward IV's hold on the crown by securing the succession.
It might also have been worth considering figures such as Anne Boleyn and Elizabeth Woodville, who aimed to be queen consort rather than royal concubine; court mistresses such as Aemilia Lanyer and Lady Martha Penistone (mistress to Richard Sackville, 3rd Earl of Dorset); women who traded sex work not only for trinkets and finery but also for basic necessities of food and shelter--sometimes as a primary occupation but perhaps as often as a supplement to inadequate means of sustenance; and shopkeeping wives "pimped out" by husbands to attract customers.
The vibrant story is woven through the stories of three women, and each one's quest for power as they manipulate behind the scenes of history - Elizabeth Woodville, Margaret Beaufort and Anne Neville.
The tale is woven through the stories of three different, driven women - Elizabeth Woodville, Margaret Beaufort and Anne Neville - in their quest for power as they manipulate behind the scenes of history.
Three intelligent and resourceful women, Elizabeth Woodville (Rebecca Ferguson), Margaret Beaufort (Amanda Hale) and Anne Neville (Faye Marsay), are determined to make their voices heard at the latter part of the 15th century.
The story is vibrantly woven around the stories of three different yet equally driven women - Elizabeth woodville, Margaret Beaufort and Anne Neville - in their quest for power as they manipulate behind the scenes of history.
That goes double when you're England's dashing young King Edward IV, who, after he and Elizabeth Woodville meet on a forest trail, realizes he simply must have her.
The fifth volume features Elizabeth of York (later Queen Elizabeth), daughter of Elizabeth Woodville (otherwise known as the White Queen), who falls in love with Richard III despite her mother's intention to marry her to Henry Tudor (Henry VII).
UK biographer/journalist Gristwood (Elizabeth and Leicester) relates the largely unexamined roles of the key royal women in the Shakespeare drama-worthy events that led to the rise of the Tudor dynasty: Marguerite of Anjou, Cecily Neville, Ann Neville, Elizabeth Woodville, Margaret of Burgundy, Elizabeth of York, and Margaret Beaufort.