Elizabethan

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Elizabethan

1. of, characteristic of, or relating to England or its culture in the age of Elizabeth I (1533--1603; reigned 1558--1603) or to the United Kingdom or its culture in the age of Elizabeth II (born 1926; queen from 1952)
2. of, relating to, or designating a style of architecture used in England during the reign of Elizabeth I, characterized by moulded and sculptured ornament based on German and Flemish models
References in periodicals archive ?
Once you arrive thither, you'll find yourself thrust back in history to the Elizabethan era, landing in Port Deptford, a fictional town bordering the Santa Fe Dam lake.
Aylmer takes Handley back to the Elizabethan era to crack jokes about nylons, rationing and Hitler.
Other interesting debates might also occur: the conclusion states that in the early Elizabethan era, "a staunchly Protestant body of aldermen affiliated to John Aldrich and Thomas Sotherton's family connection through the Merchant Adventurers' Company--working in conjunction with Bishop John Parkhurst--assumed the mantle of evangelizing urban society" (253).
Overlooking the award-winning beaches with their gaily-painted huts is Gun Hill, where six culverins from the Elizabethan era protect the shore.
Adrianne Pieczonka as Donna Anna, who gives a powerful vocal performance, is attired in Elizabethan era ruffles and Carlos Alvarez as Don Giovanni is similarly festooned in an opulent tunic, presumably imparting the court fashions of Molina's original production.
And the Elizabethan era was a pivotal time in history, she says.
When the Elizabethan era begin, it became the fashion to have high foreheads and women would pluck out the unwanted hair to achieve this look.
He explains how the history and culture of the Elizabethan era are the backdrop to the plays.
Introductory material includes the life of Shakespeare, the Elizabethan era, Elizabethan and Jacobean theater, and Shakespeare's language.
Like Alan Halsey (or more pertinently, Allen Fisher), Selerie can see the course of history as being innovative, which helps with his adaption and appreciation of the first Elizabethan era, because it is the literature of this period that he constantly, and conscientiously, finds need to refer to.
Whickham was the site of early and relatively easy coal extraction during the Elizabethan era.
Considering the interesting intersection of the concepts of pre-destination and freewill, a religious issue hotly debated during the Elizabethan era, I wanted to examine the Chorus as Fate -- an entity that observes and can influence events.

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