Elizaphan

Elizaphan

(ēlĭz`əfăn, ĕlĭzā`–). In the Bible, Aaron's cousin. An alternate spelling is Elzaphan.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Elizaphan Ntakirutimana fled to Texas and was arrested there in 1996.
Pastor Elizaphan Ntakirutimana and his son Gerard were accused of herding Tutsi men, women and children into a church and hospital compound in the Kibuye region of western Rwanda in 1994 and then calling Hutus to come to kill them.
In late 1996, the FBI arrested the pastor, Elizaphan Ntakirutimana, on a UN warrant.
The decision allowed seventy-five-year-old Elizaphan Ntakirutimana to face the United Nations' war crimes tribunal for his alleged involvement in the 1994 genocide of more than 500,000 Rwandan people, mainly Tutsis, including those who sought refuge in his church and hospital.
This comes hard on the heels of the US Supreme Court's 25 January ruling on the extradition of Rwandan clergyman and genocide suspect, Pastor Elizaphan Ntakirurimana.
Elizaphan Ntakirutimana, a senior pastor at the Mugonero Complex, betrayed his parishioners, some of whom had actively sought his help during the genocide, by leading attackers to their hiding place, pointing out Tutsi refugees attempting to flee, and encouraging and inciting the attackers to kill them.
In February 2003, the ICTR concluded the trials of Elizaphan Ntakirutimana, a Seventh-day Adventist pastor, and his son, Gerald Ntakirutimana.
Former Attorney General of the United States, Defense attorney for Slobodan Milosevic and Saddam Hussein and Elizaphan Ntakirutimana at the ICTR.
providing example of Elizaphan Ntakirutimana, whom the United States took four years to extradite to Tribunal headquarters in Tanzania).
Earlier, the tribunal released Elizaphan Ntakirutimana, an 82-year-old former senior pastor of the Seventh-day Adventist Church who was serving a 10-year prison sentence meted out in 2003 for his role in the genocide.
In 2003, the ICTR concluded the trials of Elizaphan Ntakirutimana, a Seventh-day Adventist pastor, and his son, Gerald Ntakirutimana.
I remembered Bisesero again last March, when the same tribunal convicted Pastor Elizaphan Ntakirutimana, the former head of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Rwanda, and his son, Gerard, a doctor, of assisting in the genocide.