Ellery Queen


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Queen, Ellery

See Dannay, Frederic.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.

Queen, Ellery

dilettantish private investigator. [Am. Lit.: Her-man, 105]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Both the author and lead character of his novels, Ellery Queen was actually the partnership of Frederic Dannay and his cousin Manfred Lee.
Ellery Queen the "By Bi" EQ is the joint penname of two collaborators.
The first story in English by Borges, "The Garden of Forking Paths," appeared in 1948 in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, specializing in pulp detective fiction.
Showbiz legend has it that it actually only saw light of day because of the failure of a predecessor: Ellery Queen.
Her work has appeared in New Woman, the Harvard Post, Alert Diver, the Improper Bostonian, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Worcester Magazine and other national/regional publications.
"Like Ellery Queen, where she's discovering what's going on, or Murder, She Wrote: Momma's Mysteries."
Bernstein also worked extensively in television, including themes and scores for "General Electric Theater," "Staccato," "Riverboat," "Julia," "The Rookies," "Ellery Queen" and perhaps his best-known TV signature, the fanfare for "National Geographic" specials.
Paul Staudohar had done an admirable job of collecting stories from such famous fiction writers as Ellery Queen, P.G.
Then, he decided, it would be promoted as a medication that fights a headache in "three ways." As Americans were to learn, especially fans of The Adventures of Ellery Queen on radio, sponsored by Bromo Seltzer, there was more to a headache than just pain in the human head.
This is the sort of cerebral play that kept a generation glued to the adventures of Ellery Queen and Perry Mason and attracted their children to the likes of Inspector Morse and Prime Suspect on Mystery.
"I Will Please Come to Order" was picked up by Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and later chosen by Anthony Boucher for his annual "best of the year" anthology.
Whether Ellery Queen warrants nearly twice the space given to Patricia Highsmith, or whether Agatha Christie should have more than Dorothy Sayers, or why Daniel Woodrell, who starting writing his tough, outspoken stories in 1986 (his latest was reviewed on this page recently) should be completely ignored - these and other vagaries are much less important than the accuracy of the book's facts, the enormous amount of information it contains, and its pioneering approach to its subject.