Ellesmere Land

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ellesmere Land

 

a region in central Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, extending from Baumann Fjord and Makinson Inlet in the south to Bay Fjord and Buchanan Bay in the north. The region was named after the English political and cultural figure F. Egerton, earl of Ellesmere.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
North of Lancaster Sound there is little we know anything about, except North Devon and Ellesmere Land; but even there live a few scattered people, next door, as it were, to the very Pole.
From the cut of her sharp-pointed hood, and the long diamond pattern of her white deer-skin leggings, they supposed she came from Ellesmere Land. She had never seen tin cooking-pots or wooden-shod sleighs before; but Kotuko the boy and Kotuko the dog were rather fond of her.
When he and the girl went north to Ellesmere Land in the year of the Wonderful Open Winter, he left the picture-story with Kadlu, who lost it in the shingle when his dog-sleigh broke down one summer on the beach of Lake Netilling at Nikosiring, and there a Lake Inuit found it next spring and sold it to a man at Imigen who was interpreter on a Cumberland Sound whaler, and he sold it to Hans Olsen, who was afterward a quartermaster on board a big steamer that took tourists to the North Cape in Norway.
The final expedition to use Fort Conger was the 1934-35 Oxford University Ellesmere Land Expedition, organized by Edward Shackleton (1937).
MacMSillan) Third Thule Commander Godfred 1920 Expedition Hansen, Royal Danish Navy Danish Danish geologist 1921 Bicentenary and explorer Lauge Jubilee Koch Expedition Oxford University RCMP Sergeant 1935 Ellesmere Land Henry Stallworthy.
Arctic journeys: The story of the Oxford University Ellesmere Land Expedition 1934-5.
The Oxford University Ellesmere Land Expedition (OUELE) of 1934-35, organized by Edward (later Lord) Shackleton, became the first to reach the ice cap of northern Ellesmere Island.