Ellis Island


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Ellis Island,

island, c.27 acres (10.9 hectares), in Upper New York Bay, SW of Manhattan island. Government-controlled since 1808, it was long the site of an arsenal and a fort, but most famously served (1892–1954) as the chief immigration station of the United States. It is estimated that 40% of all Americans had an ancestor arrive at Ellis Island. Now part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument (see Liberty, Statue ofLiberty, Statue of,
statue on Liberty Island in Upper New York Bay, commanding the entrance to New York City. Liberty Island, c.10 acres (4 hectares), formerly Bedloe's Island (renamed in 1956), was the former site of a quarantine station and harbor fortifications.
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), the island was opened to tourists in 1976. In 1990 an immigration museum was opened, and many records of immigrant arrivals have been computerized and are available there and on line. In 1998 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that, pursuant to an 1834 interstate compact, only the original 3.3 acres (1.3 hectares) belong to New York, the remainder (created by landfill operations) belongs to New Jersey. See also Angel IslandAngel Island,
largest island in San Francisco Bay, W Calif. Explored by the Spanish in 1775, it came under U.S. control in 1851. The U.S. army used the island as a base from 1863 to 1946, and from 1955 to 1962 a radar and missile site was there.
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Ellis Island

immigration center where many families were separated; “isle of tears.” [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 193]
References in periodicals archive ?
This project will help improve the ferry service to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, allowing more people to enjoy these landmarks and learn about our diverse history as a nation, said Rep.
People who work at the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island disembark from a ferry at Battery Park, Saturday, Jan.
In the "Fire Island to Ellis Island" PITP program, the NPS sites range from National Seashore to urban monuments and museums, and, although they may seem disparate, the two lenses through which we study this environment--water as a factor of local habitats and immigration as the historical essence of New York--are intimately related New York is a city of islands stretching from Brooklyn and Queens to Montauk Point at the tip of Long Island; it is a landscape surrounded by water and deeply connected to the fishing and shipping industries and the port of New York.
As in history, some of the student "immigrants" who took part in the Ellis Island re-enactment Wednesday were meant to hail from Poland, Germany, France, Spain, Great Britain and other European countries.
Dreaming of America (Bunting, 2000) documents Annie Hall's passage, who was literally the first immigrant to pass through Ellis Island. The privileged Annie Hall had gold rings and rubies arrive on her birthday; she shared a private cabin with her brothers, danced frequently, ate good food throughout the voyage, and faced no threat of illness.
Today, Ellis Island - the former stately holding pen and entryway for millions fleeing poverty and persecution in their home countries - is a grand and fascinating museum just one island over, and a short and breezy boat ride from the teal beauty of the Statue of Liberty.
Encountering Ellis Island is organized into five loosely chronological but thematic chapters, beginning with the various forces that brought Europeans to America and ending with what happened to immigrants once they successfully completed the process.
She finally gained her shot with Whole Foods by making an offer they couldn't refuse: no payment on the first order, if it didn't sell, Ellis Island would be a memory.
These units also include books about Ellis Island and the life of immigrants here in the United States.
You might also wish to incorporate the Ellis Island website (http://www.ellisisland.org/) into the lesson, before or during the suggested activity.
through Ellis Island. Today, its ornate Victorian buildings stand as a museum and memorial in New York Harbor, in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty.
So it was that on January 1, 1892, because of the vast numbers arriving on her shores, that the US authorities built a new facility at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbour, on a small island known as Ellis Island, to receive and process the thousands waiting to be admitted as citizens.